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Artemis

With Artemis missions, we are exploring the Moon for scientific discovery, technology advancement, and to learn how to live and work on another world as we prepare for human missions to Mars. We will collaborate with commercial and international partners and establish the first long-term presence on the Moon. NASA will land the first woman and first person of color on the Moon, using innovative technologies to explore more of the lunar surface than ever before.

Artemis

Why We Are Going To The Moon

We’re going back to the Moon for scientific discovery, economic benefits, and inspiration for a new generation of explorers: the Artemis Generation. While maintaining American leadership in exploration, we will build a global alliance and explore deep space for the benefit of all.

Learn More About the Moon about Why We Are Going To The Moon
Image of the Moon
Waxing gibbous Moon at 11 days old.
Ernie Wright / NASA

Our success will change the world

What more can we learn at the Moon?

The Moon is a treasure trove of science.

Earth’s Moon is a 4.5-billion-year-old time capsule, pristinely preserved by the cold vacuum of space. The lunar samples returned during the Apollo Program dramatically changed our view of the solar system, and scientists continue to unlock new secrets from those samples. Yet, we are just scratching the surface of knowledge about the Moon. Future samples from Artemis missions will continue to advance our knowledge of the history and formation of our solar system including Earth and the Moon.

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malapert massif
Malapert massif (informal name) is thought to be a remnant of the South Pole – Aitken basin rim, which formed more than 4 billion years ago.  More recently, this magnificent peak (lower left) was selected as an Artemis III candidate landing region.
NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University

How We Explore the Moon

Together, the Orion spacecraft, SLS rocket, Gateway, human landing systems, and advanced spacesuits represent the core of NASA’s infrastructure for long-term human exploration at the Moon.

Orion and the Earth

Getting to the Moon

Learn about the systems that carry astronauts to the Moon.

In Lunar Orbit

Learn about living and working aboard Gateway in lunar orbit.

Artist concept of astronauts in the xEMU space suit setting up science experiments on the lunar surface.

On the Lunar Surface

Learn about systems to live and work on the surface of the Moon.

Artemis Accords

We go together.

The Artemis Accords are grounded in the Outer Space Treaty of 1967, outlining the vision and principles for a safe, transparent environment that facilitates exploration, science, and commercial activities for all of humanity to enjoy. To date, 29 countries have joined the accords and are committed to establishing a peaceful, prosperous future in space. More countries will sign the Artemis Accords in the months and years ahead to ensure the entire world can benefit from our journey of exploration and discovery.

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This graphic displays the flags of the nations that have signed the Artemis Accords against a background image of the Moon in the blackness of space. The graphic is titled “Artemis Accords.” The words, “United for Peaceful Exploration of Deep Space” appear on the bottom of the image.
This graphic displays the flags of the nations that have signed the Artemis Accords against a background image of the Moon in the blackness of space. The graphic is titled “Artemis Accords.” The words, “United for Peaceful Exploration of Deep Space” appear on the bottom of the image.

All that we build, all that we study, all that we do, prepares us to go.

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