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Mission Archives

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Mission: Communications Satellite Launch/First U.S. Woman in Space
Space Shuttle: Challenger
Launch Pad: 39A
Launch Weight: 249,178 pounds
Launched: June 18, 1983 at 7:33:00 a.m. EDT
Landing Site: Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.
Landing: June 24, 1983 at 6:56:59 a.m. PDT
Runway: 15
Rollout Distance: 10,450 feet
Rollout Time: 75 seconds
Revolution: 98
Mission Duration: 6 days, 2 hours, 23 minutes and 59 seconds
Returned to KSC: June 29, 1983
Orbit Altitude: 160-170 nautical miles
Orbit Inclination: 28.5 degrees
Miles Traveled: 2.5 million

Crew Members

                    STS-7 Crew Image

Image above: STS-7 Crew photo with Commander Robert L. Crippen, Pilot Frederick H. Hauck and Mission Specialists John M. Fabian, Sally K. Ride and Norman E. Thagard. Image Credit: NASA

Mission Highlights

STS-7 Mission Patch Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. Two communications satellites were deployed, ANIK C-2 for TELESAT Canada and PALAPA-B1 for Indonesia, both were attached to the Payload Assist Module-D (PAM-D) motors. Seven Get Away Special canisters in the cargo bay held a variety of experiments, including one studying affects of space on social behavior of an ant colony in zero gravity. Ten experiments were mounted on the Shuttle Pallet Satellite (SPAS-01) and performed research in forming metal alloys in microgravity and the use of a remote sensing scanner. The orbiter's small control rockets were fired while SPAS-01 was held by the remote manipulator system to test the movement on an extended arm. Experiment 1: To investigate space sickness was carried out. Other payloads on this mission were: Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications-2 (OSTA-2); Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System (CFES); Monodisperse Latex Reactor (MLR) and one Shuttle Student Involvement (SSIP) experiment.

NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center