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STEM on Station

Teaching From Space

A high school student interviews the crew of the International Space Station Learn more about how you and your students can get involved in real space missions.
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NASA Office of Education

Astronaut Barbara Morgan observes a student working on a computer Visit the NASA Education website. You'll discover a wealth of information including a list of current opportunities; education related feature stories; and contact information for project representatives.
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STEM on Station

STEM on Station

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Have you ever wondered what kind of STEM activities occur on the International Space Station? Follow astronauts in this series of videos as they demonstrate STEM concepts that students investigate in grades 5-12. The astronauts demonstrate STEM principles such as Newton's Laws of Motion, surface tension, and advances in technology.

Select a topic below to go beyond textbooks, and use the videos and additional resources to supplement classroom activities.
 

Plant growth experiment bottlesElectronic circuit boardComputer graphic of a spacesuit designAstronaut Don Pettit with a globe

In-Orbit Opportunities

Young girl wearing a headset stands in front of a large posterAmateur Radio on the International Space Station -- ARISS -- "KC5ACR, this is NA1SS. How do you read me? Over." Astronauts and cosmonauts on the International Space Station use ham radios to talk to students and educators. Find out how to participate.



A student before an audience is asking a question with a live image of the station crew on a large screen in the backgroundIn-flight Education Downlinks -- "How does it feel to float? How does a spacesuit work?" A downlink is the ultimate "ask-the-experts" experience! During a downlink, students talk live with astronauts and cosmonauts on the International Space Station.



Terrain near the Ganga River in Bihar, IndiaSally Ride EarthKAM -- There is no place like home! Students can take pictures of our home planet with a digital camera located on the space station. They direct the camera to take photographs of Earth from 250 miles above its surface.



The letters SSEP beside the space stationStudent Spaceflight Experiments Program -- Design and fly a real microgravity research mini-laboratory on the International Space Station.

Things To Do

The word Live! beside flags from the U.S., the U.K. and Switzerland ISS Live!  →
Collect live telemetry and timeline data from the International Space Station.



International Space Station NASA's DLN 'STEM on Station' Activity Join NASA's Digital Learning Network where students see firsthand how operating the space station is tied to science, technology, engineering and mathematics lessons.

Page Last Updated: March 28th, 2014
Page Editor: NASA Administrator