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Media Teleconference for CIBER Results
November 6, 2014

NASA is hosting a news teleconference at 11 a.m. PST (2 p.m. EST) Thursday, Nov. 6, to announce discoveries from a sub-orbital rocket experiment that are redefining what we think of as galaxies.

Audio and visuals of the event will be streamed live online at: http://www.nasa.gov/newsaudio and http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl2

› Related release
 


Participants

  • Michael Garcia, program scientist, NASA Headquarters, Washington
  • James Bock, astronomer, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California
  • Michael Zemcov, astronomer, Caltech and JPL
  • Karoline Gilbert, assistant astronomer, Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
     

Garcia - 1

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Bock - 1

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Bock - 2

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Bock - 3

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Bock - 4

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Zemcov - 1

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Zemcov - 2

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Zemcov - 3

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Zemcov - 4

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Gilbert - 1

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CIBER Sounding Rocket launch on June 5, 2013.
A time-lapse photograph of the CIBER rocket launch, taken from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on June 5, 2013. This was the last of four launches of CIBER.
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Artist's concept of the first stars and galaxies
Our sky is filled with a diffuse background glow, known as the cosmic infrared background. Much of the light is from galaxies we know about, but previous Spitzer measurements have shown an extra component of unknown origin.
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Artist's concept
Observations from CIBER have shown a surprising surplus of infrared light filling the spaces between galaxies. To understand how scientists measured the amount of this mysterious light, imagine using the tips of icebergs to estimate their total volume of ice.
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Revealing the hidden background light of stars
This graphic illustrates how CIBER team measures a diffuse glow of infrared light filling the spaces between galaxies.
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Patterns of infrared light measured by CIBER
These images from CIBER show large patches of the sky at two different infrared wavelengths (1.1 microns and 1.6 microns) after all known galaxies have been subtracted out.
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Chart for brightness and wavelengths
This plot shows data from CIBER rockets launched in 2010 and 2012.
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This artist's concept shows a view of a number of galaxies sitting in huge halos of stars
This artist's concept shows a view of a number of galaxies sitting in huge halos of stars. The stars are too distant to be seen individually and instead are seen as a diffuse glow, colored yellow in this illustration.
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Image for media telecon
A recent image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope of a cluster of galaxies shows the same type of star glow as seen by CIBER only at smaller scales.
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Galaxies collide to form larger structures in our universe, kicking out stars. CIBER has detected what appears to be an infrared glow from these stranded stars (appearing as yellow clouds) on large scales across our sky.
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This video shows the launch of CIBER from the U.S. White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico in 2012. A second 2013 launch is shown next from NASA's Wallops Space Flight Facility in Virginia, only this time in slow motion.
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Page Last Updated: November 6th, 2014
Page Editor: Tony Greicius