Follow this link to skip to                                      the main content

Feature

Text Size

Launching the NASA Vision
05.17.04
 
If you're going back to the Moon, you ought to visit the place that made it happen the first time.

That was the idea when Admiral Craig Steidle, NASA's associate administrator for Exploration Systems, visited the Kennedy Space Center May 13. His reason for the trip was simple: find out what KSC had to offer, and match that to the requirements of NASA's new vision. Admiral Craig Steidle at the Orbiter Processing Facility.

"This is certainly the operations center of the future," noted Steidle. "It also is the Center around which we will develop those technologies for life-cycle support of our systems and our infrastructures in the future."

Image to right: Adm. Craig Steidle listens as Conrad Nagel, chief of the Shuttle Program Office, discusses the processing of orbiters at KSC. Credit: NASA.

Steidle, who retired from the Navy in 2000, was selected by NASA in January of this year to run the Office of Exploration Systems. That makes him responsible for figuring out the best way to get America back to the Moon and eventually beyond.

"This is the greatest job I've ever had, or could possibly have," said Steidle, adding that he knew that NASA's workforce shared his excitement about their own positions. "They are really happy to be a part of everything that's going on."

Steidle's visit to Kennedy Space Center included a tour of the Orbiter Processing Facility, the Space Station Processing Facility, and meetings with KSC's leadership, including Center Director Jim Kennedy.

"This is an opportunity for KSC to share with Admiral Steidle what we've done in the past, to support programs at the Kennedy Space Center, and (show) the capabilities we think we have to contribute to this beautiful vision of exploration that our nation now has," said Kennedy.

To learn more about NASA's Office of Exploration Systems and the new vision, visit http://www.nasa.gov/missions/solarsystem/explore_main.html
 
 
Matthew Cavagnaro
NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center