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Lead Increment Scientist's Highlights for the Week of Feb. 4, 2013
February 15, 2013
 

Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield holds two Material Science Laboratory Solidification and Quench Furnace (MSL SQF) Sample Cartridge Mechanical Protection Containers (MPCs) during the cartridge exchange in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. (NASA) Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield holds two Material Science Laboratory Solidification and Quench Furnace (MSL SQF) Sample Cartridge Mechanical Protection Containers (MPCs) during the cartridge exchange in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. (NASA)
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Blue Earth Gazing was inspired by Otsukimi, which is a Japanese traditional custom to see the moon. Blue Earth Gazing is an onboard artistic effort that allows people to see the Earth through reflected images on the surface of the water. This new way of Earth viewing enlightens the general public about microgravity and human spaceflight. (JAXA/Takahiro Ando) Blue Earth Gazing was inspired by Otsukimi, which is a Japanese traditional custom to see the moon. Blue Earth Gazing is an onboard artistic effort that allows people to see the Earth through reflected images on the surface of the water. This new way of Earth viewing enlightens the general public about microgravity and human spaceflight. (JAXA/Takahiro Ando)
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EXPRESS Rack 3 (NASA) EXPRESS Rack 3 (NASA)
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(Highlights: week of Feb. 4, 2013) - Canadian Space Agency astronaut Chris Hadfield performed the Education Payload Operation-Space Sports 2-Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) with NASA astronaut Thomas Marshburn onboard the International Space Station. EPO Demos are educational videos; the Space Sports2 video is intended for grades 5-8 students and educators. Objectives include demonstrating how crew members play games and sports in a microgravity environment and how Isaac Newton's Laws of Motion are applied to games in space.

Hadfield exchanged the Material Science Laboratory sample cartridge assembly. A Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Solidification Processing (CETSOL) was successfully installed and processed. The CETSOL investigation aims to deepen the understanding of the physical principles that govern solidification processes in metal alloys. The patterns of the crystals resulting from transitions of liquids to solids are of great importance to processes in producing materials such as metal alloys.

Hadfield reviewed the Japanese Aerospace and Exploration Agency Payload Observation 10 (JAXA EPO10) Blue Earth Gazing materials, set up the hardware and performed two Blue Earth Gazing experiment video takes. He performed closeout activities at the end of the operation. Blue Earth Gazing is an onboard artistic effort that allows people to see the Earth through reflected images on the surface of the water. This new way of Earth viewing enlightens the general public about microgravity and human spaceflight. The crew member performs in-orbit demonstrations that show microgravity provides a unique environment useful not only for exploration by scientists and engineers, but also for writers, poets, teachers, artists, etc.

NASA astronaut Kevin Ford, Expedition 34 commander, loaded the Rack Interface Controller, or RIC, Release 8 Software on EXpedite the PRocessing of Experiments for Space Station Racks (EXPRESS Racks) 3 and 5. EXPRESS Racks are multipurpose payload rack systems that store and support research aboard the space station. The racks can support science experiments in any discipline by providing structural interfaces, power, data, cooling, water and other items needed to operate science experiments in space.

Hadfield performed nine Investigating the Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions-3 (InSPACE-3) runs. To date, 41 of the 47 runs are complete. InSPACE-3 studies the fundamental behavior of magnetic colloidal fluids under the influence of various magnetic fields. This technology has promise to improve the ability to design structures, such as bridges and buildings, to better withstand earthquake forces.

Other human research investigations continued for various crew members including Neurospat, Nutrition, Repository and Reaction Self Test.

Vic Cooley, Lead Increment Scientist
Expedition 33/34


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Page Last Updated: July 28th, 2013
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