Electric Nose Monitoring (E-NOSE) - 06.28.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

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The following content was provided by Carlos D'Amico, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Carlos D'Amico, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
A Macagnano, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
S. Nardis, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
S Pantalei, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
R. Paolesse, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Giorgio Pennazza, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
E. Zampetti, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
M. De Luca, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Marco Santonico, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
F. Lo Castro, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Eugenio Martinelli, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy
Corrado Di Natale, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy

Developer(s)
G&A Engineering Srl., Oricola (AQ), Italy

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
Information Pending

Research Benefits
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ISS Expedition Duration
October 2004 - October 2005

Expeditions Assigned
10,11

Previous Missions
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Experiment Description

Research Overview
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Description
An artificial olfactory system (or simply put, an electronic nose) represents an interesting tool for various applications such as food quality control, identification of noxious gases and compounds in industrial sites and biomedicine. This type of system can also be useful as a diagnostic tool for space applications. The device could also be used on board the ISS for the detection of stagnation states, where the air circulation is limited and where CO2 or other gases can be present at high concentration or where mould could grow. The ENM experiment is based on a very promising tool, which uses a new class of chemical sensors that are designed to provide the overall olfactory profiles of a large number of chemical compounds within a closed environment. The objective of this experiment is to test the technology of this system under microgravity conditions and to verify its applicability to space applications.

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Applications

Space Applications
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Earth Applications
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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
The ENM experiment is made up of an array of 8 thin disks of quartz, an electronic part related to the sensor interfaces and sensor signal processing and by a pneumatic part consisting in a valve, a pump and tubes. Each sensor can interact with different ranges of volatile organic compounds. All the ENM equipment will be accommodated in a metallic container and located in the Soyuz capsule for launch in a passive configuration (i.e. power-off). The experiment will require a set up phase followed by three runs carried out at different locations in order to test the functionality of the device under different conditions. The ENM works in such a way that requires a comparison of the sample under test with a reference sample, which in this case will be the ISS air outlet. The experiment will consist of a 3 runs, each lasting approximately 6 hours. The experiment is connected to a laptop, and data acquisition will be carried out in automatic mode. At the end of each session the ENM and the Laptop will be moved to a new location in the ISS to execute a new run.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

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Results/More Information

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Results Publications

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Ground Based Results Publications

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ISS Patents

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Related Publications

    Stenzel C.  Deployment of precise and robust sensors on board ISS-for scientific experiments and for operation of the station. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. 2016 September; 408(24): 6517–6536. DOI: 10.1007/s00216-016-9789-0. PMID: 27526089. [Also mentions Immunolab and FIPEX.]

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Related Websites
ESA Erasmus Experiment Archive

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Imagery

image
NASA Image: ISS034E057227 - Cosmonaut Roman Romanenko working with the Electronic Nose (Enose), and Nose Target Book hardware in the Service Module (SM).

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image NASA Image: ISS034E057222 - Cosmonaut Roman Romanenko working with the Electronic Nose (Enose) hardware in the Service Module (SM).
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image NASA Image: iss034e051551 - Cosmonaut Roman Romanenko works with the Electronic Nose hardware in the Zvezda service module aboard the International Space Station in Earth orbit.
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