Biochemical Status of Humans in Long-term Spaceflight (Biotest) (Biotest) - 05.09.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Biochemical Status of Humans in Long-term Spaceflight (Biotest) studies metabolic adaptation to extended spaceflight conditions to broaden the existing information base on changes in metabolism and its hormonal regulation in microgravity.
Science Results for Everyone
To better understand how humans adapt to microgravity, researchers measured hormonal, metabolic, and biochemical indicators on the ground and the final stages of long-term spaceflight. They found no changes in some types of hormones, such as those secreted by the adrenal cortex, which controls stress response. They did find changes in hormones that reflect an individual’s metabolism and activity, such as thyroid hormones. Some of the indicators varied depending on flight duration and crew member age. The data will be used to assess the physical state of crew members on long-duration space flights and help develop and improve diagnostic tools and preventive measures.

The following content was provided by V B. Noskov, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
V B. Noskov, Institute for Biomedical Problems, Moscow, Russia

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Information Pending

Sponsoring Space Agency
Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos)

Sponsoring Organization
Information Pending

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
August 2001 - December 2002; November 2002 - May 2003; April 2003 - April 2005

Expeditions Assigned
3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview
Information Pending

Description
Information Pending

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Applications

Space Applications
Biotest data improves medical monitoring, training, and postflight rehabilitation of crew members for long-term spaceflight.

Earth Applications
Biotest promotes the development of space and ground medicine.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
Information Pending

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Ground laboratories measured the hormonal, metabolic, and biochemical indicators of the space adaptation process in blood samples collected from crew members. Overall results were found to be within accepted normal standards. In the final stage of long-term spaceflight, no increase in the secretion of the stress hormones, glucocorticoids, and mineralocorticoids of the adrenal cortex was noted. The association between reproductive hormones and pancreatic hormone indicators was also not affected during long-term spaceflight. The pattern of the changes in thyroid hormones before, during, and after long-term spaceflight reflected the state of metabolism, functional activity, and the main metabolism level in crew members while the thryotrophic hormone-thyroid hormone regulation feedback loop remains normal. The dynamic of water/salt metabolism parameters and its regulation correlates to flight duration and the age of crew members.

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Results Publications

    Smith SM, Westney ME, O'Brian KO, Morukov BV, Larina IM, Abrams SA, Davis-Street DE, Oganov VV.  Bone markers, calcium metabolism, and calcium kinetics during extended-duration space flight on the mir space station. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2005; 20(2): 208-218.

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Ground Based Results Publications

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ISS Patents

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Related Publications

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Related Websites
Energia - Science Research on the ISS Russian Segment

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Imagery

image Reflectron 4. Image courtesy of FSA.
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image Plasma 03 centrifuge. Image courtesy of FSA.
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