Materials International Space Station Experiment-10-NASA (MISSE-10-NASA) - 11.14.18

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ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The Materials International Space Station Experiment-10-NASA (MISSE-10-NASA) hosts a suite of eight NASA investigations aboard the Materials International Space Station Flight Facility (MISSE-FF). MISSE-FF is a permanent platform designed to be affixed to the exterior of the International Space Station to offer private researchers and scientists the ability to test materials, conduct technology demonstrations, and test things like circuitry, cameras and computer boards, all against one of the harshest of environments – space. The MISSE-10 mission exposes 188 samples consisting of radiation protection, radiation detection, laminates, coatings, polymetric, high-efficiency low-mass solar cell systems, composites and additively-manufactured materials to the space environment.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Darrin T. Walker, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Sheila Thibeault, Ph.D., NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States
Miria Finckenor, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
John Carr, Ph.D., NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
Mark Hasegawa, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States
Norman Wagner, Ph.D., University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States
Maria Katzarova, Ph.D., University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States
Kim De Groh, M.S., NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH, United States
Donald Thomsen, Ph.D., NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Alpha Space , Houston, TX, United States
NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States
University of Delaware, Newark, DE, United States
NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
Technology Demonstration Office (TDO)

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
October 2018 - April 2019

Expeditions Assigned
57/58

Previous Missions
MISSE-9

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • Materials International Space Station Experiment-10-NASA (MISSE-10-NASA) includes 8 investigations that test and qualify the resistance of materials on low-Earth orbit.
  • The High Efficiency, Low-Mass Solar Cell Systems passively exposes solar cells needed for small form factor spacecraft to the space environment.
  • Innovative Coatings Experiment evaluates the optical stability and performance of next generation thermal control, molecular adsorber, and low surface energy coatings in the International Space Station (ISS) low-Earth orbit environment for future NASA missions.
  • Radiation Protection Technologies Demonstration tests various high-hydrogen radiation shielding materials for use in future spacecraft and personal radiation detectors for crew members.
  • Space Environmental Effects of Additively Manufactured Materials studies the space environmental effects on three-dimensional printed polymers and metals.
  • Polymers and Composits Experiment tests the durability of new materials developed for atomic oxygen resistance and radiation shielding.
  • Improved EVA Suit Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection Using Shear-Thickening Fluid (STF) ArmorTM and Self-Healing Polymers experiment tests shear-thickening fluid (STF)-treated space suit layups for improved protection of crew members performing EVA missions.
  • Polymers and Composites Experiment (PCE) studies space environment rates of erosion and durability for both existing and future spacecraft.
  • Space Environment Exposure: Tantalum Fiber Laminates and Charge Dissipation Film (Z-Shields) examines the space environment effects of these materials in the nadir direction to compare against the ram and zenith samples that are currently on-orbit.

Description

Materials International Space Station Experiment-10-NASA (MISSE-10-NASA) is a suite of eight investigations. Each investigation is custom mounted to decks that are installed in each half of a MISSE Sample Carrier (MSC). Fourteen sample decks deploy as part of the MISSE-10 mission, with a total of 188 individual NASA and commercial samples. The following are the investigations:
 
High Efficiency, Low-Mass Solar Cell Systems
John Carr and Miria Finckenor, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL
The High Efficiency, Low-Mass Solar Cell Systems experiment passively exposes candidate solar cells to the space environment. In addition, thin polymeric films, developed as cover slide materials for these solar cells, are exposed as separate samples, to measure atomic oxygen erosion yield and transmission changes due to ultraviolet radiation. Thirty solar cells divided into three major configurations along with three films and a radiation dosimeter (device used for measuring ionizing radiation) are on the zenith-facing side of Materials International Space Station Experiment-Flight Facility (MISSE-FF) to support this experiment.
 
Innovative Coatings Experiment (ICE)
Mark Hasegawa, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
The Innovative Coatings Experiment (ICE) evaluates the optical stability and performance of next generation thermal control, molecular adsorber, and low surface energy coatings in the ISS low-Earth orbit environment for future NASA missions. The coatings evaluated in the ICE experiment are developed to improve the thermal design, the environmental compatibility, and contamination control for various programs. Ground based testing using combined ultraviolet (UV), atomic oxygen, and vacuum exposures are limited and may not accurately simulate the low-Earth orbit environment; thus, the most effective way to determine the long duration effects of the space environment is to expose these coatings to the actual low-Earth orbit environment. Fourteen samples on the nadir face, 28 samples on the ram face, and 14 samples on the zenith face areexposed to the space environment on MISSE-FF.
 
Polymeric Materials Experiment
Sheila Thibeault, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA
The Polymeric Materials Experiment aims to test the durability of new materials developed for atomic oxygen resistance and radiation shielding. This experiment as part of MISSE-10 is placed on the nadir side of MISSE-FF in order to compare it to the results of the otherwise identical past experiment in MISSE-9. Before materials may be safely used in space, they need to be tested in an actual space environment. Samples of these new materials are already on MISSE-FF in the ram, wake, and zenith orientations for one year as part of MISSE-9 and then returned to Earth for analyses in ground-based laboratories. MISSE-10 completes the science with samples on the nadir face. The following materials properties are measured: erosion yield, tensile strength, tensile modulus, radiation shielding effectiveness, and radical concentration. The expected impact of this experiment is to increase the Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) of these new materials for use in space missions.
 
Radiation Protection Technologies Demonstration
Robert Edahl and Sheila Thibeault, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA
The Radiation Protection Technologies Demonstration tests various high-hydrogen radiation shielding materials, the performance of radiation-sensitive metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistor (RADFET) radiation dosimeters, and the performance of thermoluminescent dosimeters. These materials may be used in future CubeSat designs, but have all kinds of benefits to Earth applications including miniature personal dosimeters for first responders to nuclear accidents, nuclear power plant protection, radiation diagnosis and treatment in medical facilities. Two samples of materials that are three inches thick are on both the ram and zenith faces of MISSE-FF. In addition to the ram and zenith, dosimeters are also mounted on the nadir face. The material properties to be measured when these samples are returned to Earth include mass loss, glass transition temperature, mechanical strength, mechanical modulus, atomic oxygen resistance, radiation shielding effectiveness, and surface morphology. The durability and reliability of the RADFET radiation dosimeters is determined as well. Exposure to space environment is necessary to determine if these materials and dosimeters are suitable for future spacecraft protection and crew member safety respectively.
 
Space Environmental Effects of Additively Manufactured Materials
Miria Finckenor, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL
The Space Environmental Effects of Additively Manufactured Materials investigation studies the space environmental effects on three-dimensional printed polymers and metals. For MISSE-10, 16 tensile samples or materials shaped similar to dog bones are made of the following materials: Ultem polyetherimide (PEI), electrostatic dissipative polyetherketoneketone (ESD PEKK), and Inconel. The tensile samples are then flown on the nadir face of MISSE-FF. The results are compared to similar materials flown on the wake face during MISSE-9.
 
Improved EVA Suit Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Protection Using Shear-Thickening Fluid (STF) ArmorTM and Self-Healing Polymers
Norman Wagner and Maria Katzarova, University of Delaware, Newark, DE
Researchers from the University of Delaware tests the shear-thickening fluid (STF)-treated space suit layups for improved protection of astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA) missions. Three different samples are flown on the nadir facing side of MISSE-FF. STF-treated textiles may offer design opportunities for meeting flexibility and vitality requirements as well as a new age space suit to take humans beyond Earth. The durability of the materials in low-Earth orbit during MISSE-10 are an invaluable validation step for the technology.
 
Polymers and Composites Experiment (PCE-2)-Part 2
Kim de Groh, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH
Polymers and Composites Experiment (PCE) Part 2 is a passive investigation with 11 samples being flown in the nadir, 10 samples in the zenith, and 20 samples in the ram directions. These samples are accompanied by a photographic atomic oxygen (AO) fluency monitor. These flight orientations provide different environmental exposures, such as significantly different levels of AO. Polymers and other oxidizable materials may be eroded away due to reaction with AO. Therefore, to design durable spacecraft it is important to understand the rate of erosion. This is achieved by knowing the AO erosion yield (Ey), volume loss per incident oxygen atom, of spacecraft materials. The primary objective of the PCE-2 is to determine the AO Ey of polymers and composites in the space environment. Changes in optical, thermal and mechanical properties are also determined. The PCE provides important space environmental durability data for Earth and Mars orbiting spacecraft.
 
Space Environment Exposure: Tantalum Fiber Laminates and Charge Dissipation Film (Z-Shields)
Donald (Larry) Thomsen, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA
The nadir facing Tantalum Carbon Fiber Laminate Experiment studies the exposure of the Tantalum Carbon Fiber Laminate to baseline Carbon Fiber Laminate in nadir orientation. Charge Dissipation Film Experiment is an environmental test in the temperature cycling of the charge dissipation film in a vacuum and radiation environment. Space radiation dose comparisons to the baseline samples are done using thermoluminescent dosimeters, which measure total radiation dose. The Tantalum Carbon Fiber Laminate are atomic number (Z) grade radiation shielding materials innovated at NASA Langley Research Center. This experiment increases the development level of the radiation shielding materials with space heritage. The MISSE-10 nadir Tantalum Carbon Fiber Laminate Experiment studies the exposure of the Tantalum Carbon Fiber Laminate without as much atomic oxygen and ultraviolet light compared to the MISSE-9 that were facing ram and zenith orientations.

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Applications

Space Applications
The samples remain in space for up to one year, allowing researchers to make meaningful assessments about the long-term impact of factors such as temperature extremes and radiation on the performance of their innovations. Results from the investigation could be used to develop more efficient materials for use in the development of future spacecraft, spacesuits, and other materials to enable space exploration.

Earth Applications
Materials that are regularly exposed to sun and weather on Earth may be tested, improved upon, and applied after being exposed to space, one of the harshest environments, for months at a time.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols

The MISSE Flight Facility allows the integrated testing for ultraviolet radiation (UV), atomic oxygen (AO), ionizing radiation, ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), charged particles, thermal cycles, electromagnetic radiation, and micro-meteoroids. Material and component samples are mounted to MISSE Sample Carrier (MSC) decks to be exposed to the space environment in specific viewing directions including ram, wake, zenith, and nadir. Scientists can test for material or component durability and factors such as accelerated degradation.
 
MSCs are rotated out every six months utilizing robotic servicing systems. MISSE-10 includes three 6-month carriers and four 1-year duration carriers. Pictures are taken monthly utilizing the MSC camera trolley system to document any sample degradation that is visible. Sensor data is sent down continuously at a 1Hz rate when the MSC is activated. Sensor data may include deck temperatures, UV, radiation, AO, and contamination. MISSE-10 MSCs are equipped with at least the sensors requested by the Principal Investigators (PIs). This data provides early analysis and a record of the environment the samples were exposed to.
 
Once the mission duration has been satisfied, the MSCs are returned to Earth via robotic transfer utilizing the MISSE Transfer Tray (MTT) to the JEM Airlock. Once inside the ISS, the carriers are inserted into purgeable cases or bags for return in a Visiting Vehicle. Samples are deintegrated from the MSC decks in a clean room environment to allow PIs to perform detailed analysis as required for the science.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
Alpha Space

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Imagery