Evolution of E. coli Resistance to Antibiotics in Microgravity (Evolution of E. coli Resistance to Antibiotics in Microgravity) - 09.13.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The Evolution of E. coli Resistance to Antibiotics in Microgravity investigation evaluates the effectiveness of ampicillin on E. coli bacteria in a space environment. Microscopic images captured throughout the mission allow for analysis of bacteria growth. The study provides a stepping-stone for future antibiotic resistance studies.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Gentry Barnett, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Gentry Barnett, Space Tango, Inc., Lexington, KY, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Space Tango, Inc., Lexington, KY, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory (NL)

Research Benefits
Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2017 - February 2018

Expeditions Assigned
53/54

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • The Evolution of E. coli Resistance to Antibiotics in Microgravity is observed via a 45 degree ampicillin gradient.
  • Mutant isolation and genetic evolution are observed on an accelerated time scale, providing valuable insight into the damaging effects of the space environment on the immune system as well as the evolutionary mechanism of resistance in bacteria.
  • The study establishes a baseline for future antibiotic resistance studies to take place in the space environment and further our understanding of the effect of microgravity on evolution and mutations.

Description

Evolution of E. coli Resistance to Antibiotics in Microgravity evaluates the evolution of E. coli resistance to antibiotics in increasing amounts in microgravity. Microscopic images are captured throughout the mission. Observation via a 45 degree ampicillin gradient, mutant isolation, and genetic evolution are observed on an accelerated time scale, providing valuable insight into the damaging effects of the space environment on the immune system as well as the evolutionary mechanism of resistance in bacteria. This establishes a baseline for future antibiotic resistance studies to take place in the space environment and further our understanding of the effect of radiation and microgravity on evolution and mutations.

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Applications

Space Applications
The experiment takes place in the TangoLab hardware, a reconfigurable experiment ecosystem designed for microgravity research aboard the International Space Station. Successful evaluation of the function of this module creates many possibilities for microgravity research projects that are not currently possible.

Earth Applications
The study of antibiotic performance in space may give insight to new ways of managing bacterial mutations and their genetic evolution on Earth.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
The science is part of the Payload Card-5 and it is contained inside of a 1U CubeLab in soft stow, with an orientation constraint, for ascent. The crew installs the CubeLab onto a payload card and then into the TangoLab, where autonomous operations occur. At the end of operations, the crew removes and stows the hardware for return to Earth. The experiment returns on the same vehicle, and turned over to the Space Tango/Principal Investigator team upon return.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
Space Tango

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Imagery