Chaos Carolinensis Behavior and Locomotion in Microgravity (Chaos Carolinensis Behavior and Locomotion in Microgravity) - 09.13.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Giant amoeba’s unique method of movement is observed as part of Chaos Carolinensis Behavior and Locomotion in Microgravity. The amoeba’s cytoskeleton has various protrusions known as pseudopodia, which enable the mobility of such creatures through a fluid medium. Structural components, which are upon the first to experience the detrimental effects of microgravity, are examined through changes in the amoeba’s movement over time aboard the International Space Station (ISS).
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Gentry Barnett, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Gentry Barnett, Space Tango, Inc., Lexington, KY, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Space Tango, Inc., Lexington, KY, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory (NL)

Research Benefits
Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2017 - February 2018

Expeditions Assigned
53/54

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • Chaos Carolinensis Behavior and Locomotion in Microgravity investigates the behavior of the many-nucleated amoeboid in a space environment.
  • The amoeba maneuvers via the extension and contraction of cytoskeletal pseudopodia.
  • This experiment exposes the amoeba to conditions detrimental to cytoskeletal development and other processes.

Description

Amoebae are more than just model organisms, some can be highly pathogenic, responsible for the deaths of thousands via dysentery and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). Chaos Carolinensis is harmless but bears a striking anatomic resemblance to their far less friendly cousins. The Chaos Carolinensis Behavior and Locomotion in Microgravity investigation evaluates the behavior of this many-nucleated amoeboid in a space environment. The amoeba maneuvers via the extension and contraction of cytoskeletal pseudopodia, protrusions that allow for mobility. The detrimental effects of microgravity on the structure of the amoeba’s cytoskeleton may be reflected on their mobility. By studying the movement on amoebae in microgravity, there is insight for other research fields such as the function of stem cells, cytoskeleton alignment, regeneration, and cellular communication in space.

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Applications

Space Applications
The execution of this investigation provides insight into how microorganisms respond to a space environment, overall providing a platform for future microorganism experimentation aboard the International Space Station.

Earth Applications
The investigation is important to discovery science where subsequent analysis may relate to on-going research regarding the function of stem cells, cytoskeleton alignment, regeneration, and cellular communication in space, all of which are useful to life on Earth.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
The science is contained in a 2U CubeLab attached to Payload Card-5 for soft-stow ascent; this then operates in the TangoLab locker and is soft-stowed for returned. Crew members install the payload card into the TangoLab locker, where autonomous operations occur and then they remove and stow the hardware for return. The Payload Card is returned on the same vehicle and turned over to the Space Tango/Principal Investigator team upon early return.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
Space Tango

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Imagery