Plant Germination and Growth Module Evaluation (Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth) - 11.21.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The Plant Germination and Growth Module Evaluation (Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth) investigation features multiple plant species in a variety of growth stages and growth chambers. Plant species for this flight include Arabidopsis thaliana, Hordeum vulgare L., and Brachypodium distachyon. The different modules have different growth phases: some investigate the germination process from dry seed to active seedling, and some investigate the growth to mature plant. All modules provide growth lighting, thermal control, environmental data collection and imaging throughout the growth process. This investigation – led by Space Tango – will provide important scientific and technical data for many future plant growth investigations.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Gentry Barnett, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Gentry Barnett, Space Tango, Lexington, KY, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Space Tango Inc, Lexington, KY, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory (NL)

Research Benefits
Scientific Discovery

ISS Expedition Duration
April 2017 - September 2017

Expeditions Assigned
51/52

Previous Missions
SpX-10

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • The Plant Germination and Growth Module Evaluation (Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth) is a plant biology investigation that utilizes three types of seeds to evaluate the plant growth and germination modules.
  • The microgravity environment is required for the duration of the germination and plant growth, in order to assess the response of the plants under these conditions.

Description

The purpose of this two-part Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth experiment is to study how different growth phases of plants are affected by the microgravity environment. The Space Tango modules investigate the germination process from dry seed to active seedling and plant growth to mature plant.
 
The first of many Magnitude.IO experiments, Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth is a plant biology investigation utilizing Arabidopsis thaliana, a plant used in many science investigations with a genome that has been fully mapped. Students grow their own Arabidopsis thaliana plants in a specialized classroom growth chamber, concurrent with a plant growing aboard the ISS.
 
Students are to compare and contrast various environmental conditions, and the effects of gravity, on the growing plant. Specifically, the educational goals of the this experiment include: 1) to successfully grow Arabidopsis thaliana in a agar gel medium, with LED light activation, 2) to evaluate the differences between microgravity and parallel terrestrial growth systems in classrooms, and 3) to preserve the seeds for future multi-generational microgravity growth studies.
 
Successful completion of this project may lead to advancements in plant physiology in microgravity.

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Applications

Space Applications
Successful completion of this project could advance plant physiology in microgravity, contributing to the ability to eventually grow plants for food on long-term spaceflights.

Earth Applications
The Earth Application for this investigation has yet to be identified.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
The science is contained inside of a two-unit (2U) CubeLab attached to Payload Card-3 for ambient ascent. The Space Tango Payload Card Plant Germination and Growth experiment operates in the TangoLab, and is returned in ambient conditions. The crew installs the payload card into the TangoLab, where autonomous operations occur. At the end of operations, the crew removes, conditions, and stows the hardware for return to Earth. The Payload Card is returned on the same vehicle, and turned over to the Space Tango/PI team during early return either in Houston, Texas or at the California airport.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
Space Tango

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Imagery