International Space School Educational Trust-1 (ISSET-1) (International Space School Educational Trust-1 (ISSET-1) ) - 06.20.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The International Space School Educational Trust (ISSET) has teamed up with the King’s College London to perform three educational projects as part of ISSET-1 (Studies ISSET-1). Microbial Fuel Cell shows the usefulness of using microbes feeding on waste matter in a sealed environment to provide a power source to supplement the main fuel sources on the spacecraft. Cactus-Mediated Carbon Dioxide Removal in Microgravity measures the oxygen output and the carbon dioxide intake of a selected form of cactus. Activity of Mutated Drosophila in Microgravity aims to identify if there are any positive differences in movement by placing normal Drosophila flies and mutant Drosophila in a microgravity environment.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Julie Keeble, Ph.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Julie Keeble, Ph.D., International Space School Educational Trust, Penarth, United Kingdom

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Information Pending

Developer(s)
Space Tango, Inc., Lexington, KY, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory (NL)

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2016 - April 2017

Expeditions Assigned
49/50

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

The International Space School Educational Trust (ISSET) works in partnership with some of the world’s leading space organizations to deliver unique learning opportunities for students of all ages. Each of ISSET’s programs offers something unique, whether it be on an international excursion learning from some of the greatest minds in the world or our unique Mission Discovery challenge where you can send your experiment into Space. Through close working relationships with different aerospace organizations, ISSET lets students and educators team up with astronauts, rocket scientists and leading business professionals at the highest level.
 
For this project, ISSET has teamed up with Julie Keeble and the King’s College London to perform three educational projects:
  1. Microbial Fuel Cell
  2. Activity of Mutated Drosophila in Microgravity
  3. Cactus-Mediated Carbon Dioxide Removal in Microgravity

Description

  • Microbial fuel cell: With human space exploration aiming earnestly towards Mars, there are many ideas being discussed to help power the exploration, and to utilise everything available within the spacecraft. This experiment evaluates the usefulness of using microbes feeding on waste matter in a sealed environment, to provide a power source to supplement the main fuel sources on the spacecraft.
  • Ionic liquid: Ionic fluids have the potential to be extremely useful as lubricant liquids in the microgravity environment. Currently the main liquid lubricants used in the space environment come in 3 forms, but each has its disadvantages:
    • Silicones – silicone oils are prone to tearing or pushed out from the friction zone when pressure/ load is applied
    • Perfluoroethers (PFPE) – poor performance at boundary friction conditions as they react with the lubricated surfaces and create corrosive gases and metal fluorides.
    • Mineral oils – very short life span and breaks down quickly (used in sealed units mainly).
Ionic fluids have the potential to replace the majority of these lubricants in most microgravity conditions, the reason being is that ionic fluid can be tailored with specific properties, by changing the cations and anions combinations. Therefore, ionic fluids can be created to have high temperature stability, low volatility, and a low melting point. This experiment examines the lubricant properties of ionic fluids on the in the microgravity conditions aboard the International Space Station, to see if they are able to reduce the friction between a carborundum wheel and grinding stone.
  • Cactus-mediated carbon dioxide removal in microgravity: This experiment looks at the measurement of the oxygen output and the CO2 intake of a selected form of cactus. As every 6th grade child learns, plants take up CO2 and “breathe” out oxygen. This is of obvious benefit to the space station and space travel if this process can be replicated safely in a microgravity environment. Plants are notoriously difficult to grow on the International Space Station, partly because they can ‘drown’ in the water they are being grown with. Most plants need a lot of water to survive, and this could cause problems on a spacecraft with limited water supplies. Cactus do not need a lot of water to maintain their existence, and so are an ideal plant to use on the ISS for this experiment.
  • Activity of Parkinsonian Drosophila in microgravity: This experiment observes any visible differences in flight between normal Drosophila flies and mutant Parkinsonsian Drosphila in microgravity. A control version of the experiment will also be monitored back on Earth. The goal is to see if there are any differences in movement by the flies in a microgravity environment.

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Applications

Space Applications
Successful implementation of the project could lead to innovations in the fields of powering space exploration (microbial fuel cell), oxygen development during space travel (cactus), and genetic research (drosophila).

Earth Applications
The Earth Application for this investigation has yet to be identified

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
The science is contained in a 2U CubeLab attached to a Payload Card for soft-stow ascent, operates in the TangoLab-1, and is soft-stowed for return. The crew installs the Payload Card into the TangoLab-1, where autonomous operations occur, and then the crew removes and stows the hardware for return. The Payload Card is returned after the completion of the mission on the next available return vehicle (same vehicle as ascent is preferred) and turned over to the Space Tango/PI team at recovery.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
Space Tango Website

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Imagery