NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 (NanoRacks-CSUNSat1) - 06.14.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 is a CubeSat that tests out a new light-weight, longer-life battery system designed for the cold temperatures of space. A new configuration of high energy density materials known as ultra-capacitors, along with updated lithium-ion battery technology allows NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 batteries to operate at very low temperatures without the added weight of a defrost system. A set of quantitative power and capacity goals are used to assess the battery system performance over a 200 day mission period.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Sharlene Katz, Ph.D., P.E., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Sharlene Katz, Ph.D., P.E., California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
James Flynn, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA, United States
Naomi Palmer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Keith Chin, Ph.D., Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Gary Bolotin, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Marshall Smart, Ph.D., Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States
Erik Brandon, Ph.D., Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, United States

Developer(s)
California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA, United States
JPL, Pasadena, CA, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory Education (NLE)

Research Benefits
Space Exploration

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2016 - September 2017

Expeditions Assigned
49/50,51/52

Previous Missions
Information Pending

^ back to top

Experiment Description

Research Overview

This technology will reduce mass and volume of power systems by eliminating battery heaters and provide increased performance at low temperatures. The Payload goals are:
  • NanoRacks-CSUNSat1delivers at least 90% of the energy of a conventional CubeSat Power system at -35°C.
  • NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 provides 90% of the battery faceplate capacity after 200 charge/discharge cycles at 50% depth of discharge.
  • NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 provide 90% of the battery faceplate capacity after 200 days.

Description

NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 tests an innovative power system that reduces the volume and mass required for a given amount of energy storage, while functioning over a longer lifetime and at extremely low temperatures. The energy storage system utilizes a combination of ultracapacitors and newly-developed, low temperature electrolyte lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).
 
Ultracapacitors (or electrical double-layer capacitors) are a mature technology which has a number of advantages relevant to NASA’s priorities. While typical capacitors are in the millifarad range, ultracapacitors have capacitances in the hundreds or thousands of farads in the same volume. Compared to Li-ion batteries, ultracapacitors have 18 times the power density and can be charged and discharged many times more than a Li-ion battery. They are also charged and discharged faster than a battery. Used in parallel with a spacecraft battery, the ultracapacitor provides energy during peak transient loads, limiting the discharge/recharge cycle of the battery and thereby extending the potential reliable lifetime of the power system.
 
The other side of this energy storage architecture is JPL’s new low temperature electrolyte Li-ion battery. While state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries lose considerable specific energy below -20°C, the JPL low-temperature cells can operate as low as -50°C and maintain most of their specific energy. This means the JPL batteries could be operated without heaters, resulting in lower spacecraft mass and the attendant reduction in the power requirements, also resulting in lower required battery capacity and therefore less mass.

^ back to top

Applications

Space Applications
This research demonstrates a lighter, higher-performing power system that can be used to make CubeSats and other missions more efficient, especially as they travel further from the sun. NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 also demonstrates how smaller scale missions are used to test incremental hardware advances in preparation for their integration with more complex missions.

Earth Applications
This research enhances battery technology and helps improve performance of Earth-based energy storage systems. Battery systems with enhanced performance at lower temperatures are used in cold climates, aviation and submarine applications, (e.g. power systems for autonomous vehicles). This research also contributes to basic understanding of energy storage systems, which are critical to national energy markets and goals.

^ back to top

Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
NanoRacks CubeSats are delivered to the ISS already integrated within a NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer (NRCSD). A crew member transfers each NRCSD from the launch vehicle to the JEM. Visual inspection for damage to each NRCSD is performed. When CubeSat deployment operations begin, the NRCSDs are unpacked, mounted on the JAXA Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) and placed on the JEM airlock slide table for transfer outside the ISS. A crew member operates the JEM Remote Manipulating System (JRMS) – to grapple and position for deployment. CubeSats are deployed when JAXA ground controllers command a specific NRCSD.

^ back to top

Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

^ back to top

Results/More Information

Information Pending

^ back to top

Related Websites
CSUNSat1

^ back to top


Imagery

image The NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 flight hardware. Image courtesy of California State University, Northridge.
+ View Larger Image


image Exploded View of NanoRacks-CSUNSat1. Image courtesy of California State University, Northridge.
+ View Larger Image


image The Hot Shunt Regulator Board of NanoRacks-CSUNSat1. Image courtesy of California State University, Northridge.
+ View Larger Image


image Circuit Board in NanoRacks-CSUNSat1 with student/faculty team member names. Image courtesy of California State University, Northridge.
+ View Larger Image