Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) - 12.28.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Bacteria are a big problem in space as they tend to build up in the constantly-recycled atmosphere of the International Space Station (ISS). The main objective of the Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) is to find better materials to build a space station or spacecraft with, especially important for longer missions farther from Earth. Researchers will also monitor how bacteria form biofilms that protect them from cleaning agents and help them adhere to surfaces.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by L. Lemelle, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
L. Lemelle, France

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
C. Place, France
J. F. Palierne, France
C. Vaillant, France
Lucie Campagnolo, MEDES/CADMOS, Toulouse, France

Developer(s)
Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse, France
École Normale Supérieure de Lyon , Lyon, France
CEA Tech - LETI, Grenoble, France
Saint-Gobain, Courbevoie, France

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
European Space Agency

Research Benefits
Space Exploration, Earth Benefits

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2016 - September 2017; -

Expeditions Assigned
49/50,51/52,57/58

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

The Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space to see if future spacecraft could be made easier to clean. The experiment aims to understand the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions. The optimization of the internal surfaces of the International Space Station (ISS) is a challenge. The first objective is to simplify MATISS decontamination operations to save time crew. The second objective relates to space exploration: the validation of these innovative surfaces would indeed have new assets for the development of future spacecraft, including in the context of long journeys.
 

Description

The Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS) experiment consists of four identical plaques that ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet will place in the European Columbus laboratory and leave for at least three months. France’s CNES space agency, in collaboration with the ENS University of Lyon, research institute CEA Tech - LETI and construction company Saint-Gobain, selected five advanced materials that could stop bacteria from settling and growing on the surface. A sixth element, made of glass, is used as control material.
 
The materials are a diverse mix of advanced technology – from self-assembly monolayers and green polymers to ceramic polymers and water-repellent hybrid silica. The smart materials should stop bacteria from sticking to the surface and growing, effectively making them easier to clean and more hygienic.
 
The units are open on the sides to let air flow naturally through and collect any bacteria floating past. Thomas will put the four units on the European Drawer Rack, on the European Physiology Modules and at air vents.
 
At the end of his mission next year he will tape the sides to block other bacteria from entering and wrap them in plastic. They will be returned for analysis in the Soyuz spacecraft.

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Applications

Space Applications
Information Pending

Earth Applications
Beyond the space field, MATISS finds applications on Earth. For example, the qualification of new smart surfaces could be used for equipment of public transport or for coating highly sensitive and precise surfaces such as elevator buttons.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
Information Pending

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
MATISS Information from ESA's Erasmus Experiment Archive
MATISS
MATISS
PROXIMA Mission information from CNES (in French)

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Imagery

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MATISS Hardware. Image courtesy CNES –Emmanuel Grimault, 2016.

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NASA Image:  ISS050E010908 - MATISS kit floating in the Columbus Module. Photo taken during Expedition 50.

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NASA Image:  ISS050E010914 - MATISS kit installed on Columbus Module panel. Additional kits are floating within orange bag are visible. Photo taken during Expedition 50.

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NASA Image:  ISS050E010915 - MATISS kit installed on Columbus Module panel.

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