Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) - 05.09.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The measurement of liquid displacement within a sphere in microgravity relates to a given kinematic representation of a spacecraft’s fuel tank. The FLUIDICS investigation evaluates the Center of Mass (CoM) position regarding a temperature gradient on a representation of a fuel tank. The observation of capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid layer in a low-gravity environment can provide insights into measuring the existing volume in a sphere.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Jean Mignot, Stephan Fauve, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom: Fluidics

Principal Investigator(s)
Jean Mignot, CNES, France
Stephan Fauve, French Academy of Sciences, France

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
D. Lasnet, France
A. Llodra-Perez, France
L. Oro Marot, France

Developer(s)
Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse, France

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
European Space Agency

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2016 - August 2018; -

Expeditions Assigned
49/50,51/52,53/54,55/56,57/58,59/60

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

The FLUIDICS experiment covers two aspects of physical experiments on fluid mechanics. The first aspect, dedicated to the aerospace industry, must analyze the liquid sloshing phenomenon in tanks of spacecraft in the microgravity. The aim is to improve the guidance and precision of satellites, and to optimize the lifetime through better fuel management.
 
The second part of the experiment studies the wave turbulence phenomena that occurs at the surface of liquids. These result from the competition between the source of movement and the restoring forces. On Earth, the restoring forces are related firstly to gravity, and secondly, to the surface tension of the liquid. By observing this phenomenon in microgravity, scientists are able to focus only on the study of the liquid’s surface tension.
 
The FLUIDICS experiment consists of three small transparent spheres with a centrifuge to move the liquids inside. The first sphere, used for analysis of the wave turbulence experiment, holds distilled water. The other two spheres, used for the sloshing experiments, use a special liquid developed with low viscosity, and little surface tension. Results are analyzed and compared with simulation models.

Description
Information Pending

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Applications

Space Applications
Results from the FLUIDICS experiment can help in the development of better optimized designs of fuel systems for satellites, and provide for longer satellite lifetime by better managing use of fuel for maneuvering.

Earth Applications
Beyond a better understanding of fluid movements, this experiment also helps to provide a better understanding of how the Earth’s oceans work, including the phenomenon of "rogue waves". More broadly, the expected results could help to improve climate prediction systems, and optimize the use of ocean renewable energy.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
Information Pending

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
European Space Agency (ESA) Proxima Mission Website
Centre National D'├ętudes Spatiales (CNES) Proxima Mission Website (in French)

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Imagery

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Close-up photo of FLUIDICS equipment. Image courtesy of CNES.

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A view of FLUIDICS experiment equipment featuring one of the three transparent spheres. Image courtesy of CNES.

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Photoshoot of Fluidics hardware before launch to the International Space Station.  Image courtesy of CNES.

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NASA Image: ISS051E034000 - View taken to document hardware setup during the first run of the Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) experiment. The Container Box is attached to the Seat Track at COL1D1-D2, and a video camera records experiment data on the screen of a laptop computer. Image taken in the Columbus European Laboratory.

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NASA Image: ISS051E033986 - European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet is photographed with the assembled Science Arm and Motor for the Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) experiment. Image taken in the Columbus European Laboratory during preparations for the first run of the experiment.

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NASA Image: ISS051E036148 - European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet with the Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) experiment. Image taken in the Columbus European Laboratory during preparations for the first run of the experiment.

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image NASA Image: ISS051E033988 - European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet is photographed with the Tanks Bag and Science Arm for the Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) experiment. Image was taken in the Columbus European Laboratory during preparations for the first run of the experiment.
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NASA Image: ISS051E034001 - Documentation of the Container Box attached to the COL1D1-D2 Seat Track during the first run of the Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS) experiment. Image taken in the Columbus European Laboratory.

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