NanoRacks-Riverside Christian High School-Battery Life in Microgravity (NanoRacks-RCHS-Battery Life) - 11.22.16

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Batteries are crucial for countless products in everyday life, and they will also be essential for future space travel, where an electric grid isn’t available. NanoRacks-Riverside Christian High School-Battery Life in Microgravity (NanoRacks-RCHS-Battery Life) determines whether microgravity has any effect on how long it takes a battery to drain. Results provide insight into how long batteries in microgravity last before losing their charge.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Tamerisa Dyer, B.S., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Experiment Details

OpNom: NanoRacks Module-21 S/N 1002

Principal Investigator(s)
Riverside Christian High School , Riverside Christian High School, Riverside, CA, United States

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Tamerisa Dyer, B.S., Riverside Christian Academy, Riverside, CA, United States
Angela Mooney, B.S., Riverside Christian High School, Riverside, CA, United States
William LeFevre, B.S., Riverside Christian High School, Riverside, CA, United States

Developer(s)
Riverside Christian High School, Riverside, CA, United States
Valley Christian High School , San Jose , CA, United States
NanoRacks LLC, Webster, TX, United States

Sponsoring Space Agency
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

Sponsoring Organization
National Laboratory Education (NLE)

Research Benefits
Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery, Space Exploration

ISS Expedition Duration
March 2014 - September 2014

Expeditions Assigned
39/40

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • NanoRacks-Riverside Christian High School-Battery Life in Microgravity (NanoRacks-RCHS-Battery Life) seeks to confirm the results it obtained last year with its NanoRacks–RCS–Battery Performance data by testing the longevity of four batteries in identical circuits.
  • The necessity for the Battery Life project is due to the increased reliance on battery power for so much of the equipment used in life. If long-term space travel ever becomes a reality, there is a need to be able to predict accurately how long any of the batteries used to power equipment will last.

Description
The NanoRacks-Riverside Christian High School-Battery Life in Microgravity (NanoRacks-RCHS-Battery Life) is being conducted in tandem with the NanoRacks-RCHS-E. Coli Growth and the NanoRacks-RCHS-E. Coli Growth with UV Exposure experiments. Once the pump is shut off for the NanoRacks-RCHS-E. Coli Growth and the NanoRacks-RCHS-E. Coli Growth with UV Exposure experiment, the circuits to start draining the batteries are closed causing the first two Panasonic BR1225A, 3 volt, 48 mAh, Primary Coin Batteries to discharge into separate 7,500 ohm loads. The maximum discharge current of 0.4 mA is much less than the maximum allowable discharge current of 5 mA. Every 10 minutes the module measures and records the voltages across the two battery load resistors. The voltage and load resistance values allow the discharge current to be calculated. The module stores this data and transmits all 6 measurements with the pictures once each hour. After 13 days the module switches the battery load circuit from the first 2 batteries to the second set of 2 batteries and continues to collect and transmit data as before. The on orbit battery discharge voltage and current values of all eight Panasonic BR1225A, 3 volt, 48 mAh Primary Coin Batteries (note that each one of the two RCHS MicroLabs contain four Coin Batteries) are compared against identical tests conducted on earth with eight Panasonic BR1225A, 3 volt, 48 mAh Primary Coin Batteries to determine if the battery load characteristics in a microgravity environment are different than those on earth.

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Applications

Space Applications
Future space missions will rely on rechargeable batteries, charged through solar power, radioactive decay, or another form of natural energy. Batteries in constant use drain more quickly than those in storage, and it remains unclear whether microgravity affects this drainage process. Results from this investigation provide data on battery life that will help researchers prepare for long-term space travel more effectively.

Earth Applications
Understanding the mechanisms of battery drain is important for improving battery technology, especially for motor vehicle engines, airplanes and other uses that demand high power output. Results could lead to better design and production of batteries for use on Earth. In addition, students from grades 9 through 12 designed and built the investigation, connecting them to the space program and providing experience and training in science, technology, engineering and math.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
NanoRacks Module-21 is completely autonomous completely autonomous and only requires installation and removal.
Crew interaction with NanoRacks Module-21 is limited to transferring the NanoRacks locker Insert from the launch vehicle to the ISS, installation and activation of the NanoRacks Frames into the EXPRESS Rack Locker, cleaning of the air inlet filter (as necessary) and data retrieval (as needed) during the mission.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
NanoRacks

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Imagery

image The NanoRacks-Riverside Christian High School-Battery Life in Microgravity (NanoRacks-RCHS-Battery Life) investigation team. Image courtesy of Riverside Christian High School.
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