Supervisory Control of EUROBOT (SUPVIS-E) - 10.11.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Future human exploration missions are most likely to be performed with a mix of human and robotic elements to optimize mission potential and success. Supervisory Control of EUROBOT (SUPVIS-E) is one of ESA’s METERON series of experiments which seeks to expand infrastructure capabilities, and focus on the validation of end-to-end operations concepts and technologies required for complex supervisory control of a surface rover from an orbiting spacecraft. By running end-to-end space robot operations mimicking the operation of a lunar robot from an orbiting station, SUPVIS-E helps to find the constraints that mission planners do not realize exist at this time in order to compare them with current ways of working with spacecraft, crew, and robots.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Philippe Schoonejans, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom: SUPVIS

Principal Investigator(s)
Philippe Schoonejans, European Space Agency, Noordwijk, Netherlands

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Kim Nergaard, European Space Agency, Germany

Developer(s)
Thales Alenia Space, Milan, Italy
European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), Noordwijk, Netherlands
European Space Operations Centre (ESOC), Darmstadt, Germany

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
European Space Agency

Research Benefits
Information Pending

ISS Expedition Duration
March 2015 - March 2016; March 2016 - September 2016

Expeditions Assigned
43/44,45/46,47/48

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

Future human exploration missions are most likely to be performed with a mix of human and robotic elements. Pure robotics missions face the inherent problems such as communications delays of controlling assets from Earth, as well as having limited diagnostic and repair possibilities should anything unforeseen occur. Having astronauts on hand as an element of such a mission provides a greater potential for success, and an increased scope for achieving more mission milestones in a reduced time. Having robotic elements present on human spaceflight missions could also increase safety aspects for astronauts, for example with robotic scouts undertaking surface analysis in advance of arrival of astronauts from an orbiting spacecraft.
 
The International Space Station (ISS) provides a valuable simulation of a spacecraft orbiting another planetary body. ESA’s METERON series of experiments aims at testing communications, operations, and robotic control strategies in preparation for future human-robotic exploration missions to the Moon, Mars, and other celestial bodies. Supervisory Control of EUROBOT (SUPVIS-E) further expands the METERON infrastructure capabilities, and focuses on the validation of end-to-end operations concepts and technologies required for complex supervisory control of a surface rover from an orbiter. This principally involves an ISS crew member controlling ESA’s Eurobot rover on the ground to execute a number of dexterous tasks with a Lunar Cargo Lander mockup. This simulates surface site exploration, and preparation for human arrival from an orbiting spacecraft.
 
Operational considerations such as which tasks are robotic and which human, and what data is needed to support the monitoring and control of assets from an orbiting spacecraft, a surface habitat, or directly from Earth, feed directly into the design and optimization of future data and communication systems.

Description
Information Pending

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Applications

Space Applications
ESA’s METERON series of experiments aims at testing communications, operations and robotic control strategies in preparation for future human-robotic exploration missions to the Moon, Mars, and other celestial bodies. SUPVIS-E further expands the METERON infrastructure capabilities, and validates end-to-end operations concepts and technologies required for complex supervisory control of a surface rover from an orbiting spacecraft. Findings from SUPVIS-E feed directly into the design and optimisation of future data and communication systems, and can help find the "unknown unknowns'', i.e. constraints that mission planners do not realise exist, in order to compare with current ways of working with spacecraft, crew and robots.

Earth Applications
The Earth Application for this investigation has yet to be identified.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols

  • Ground-commanded testing of METERON laptop as soon as new Huntsville Operations Support Center Delay Tolerant Network (HOSC DTN) service is available, and ground-commanded verifications ideally two months prior to the first session.
  • Additional verification of METERON primary laptop, and set-up/verification of a second laptop configured initially as video streams display device.
  • With communication paths established, specific ground-commanded tests are conducted.
  • Three experiment sessions performed with initial activation and checkout of Eurobot, surveyor, and lander (and associated cameras) performed by the ground, as well as associated deactivation on session completion.
    • Session 1:  Location and inspection, and corrective maintenance of solar panel by ISS crew--image capture of surrounding area, traverse Eurobot close to lander, inspect lander (via images), traverse Eurobot to side of lander where solar array is located, and deploy solar array before moving Eurobot to front of lander.
    • Session 2:  MLI removal and inspection and Instrument deployment--image capture of surrounding area, traverse Eurobot close to lander MLI panel, open and inspect bay behind MLI panel, close MLI panel, open launch fittings, grasp payload and remove from stowage, transport payload to required location, and deploy payload before traversing Eurobot to front of lander.
    • Session 3:  Instrument Assembly--image capture of surrounding area, traverse Eurobot close to Cargo Lander connector and grasp connector, deploy cable, traverse to location of deployed payload, and mate cable before moving Eurobot to front of lander.
  • At the end of the last session with crew involvement, the crew powers off the METERON Laptops and places them into stowage.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites
SUPVIS-E information form ESA's Erasmus Experiment Archive

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Imagery