Material Science Lab Batch 2b (MSL SCA-Batch 2b-ESA) - 07.19.17

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
The Batch-2b of the Materials Science Laboratory Sample Cartridge Assemblies (MSL SCA-Batch 2b-ESA) serves two projects investigating how different phases organize in a structure when metallic alloys are solidified. The project Metastable Solidification of Composites (METCOMP) studies the phase formed by the reaction of the remaining liquid phase with an already formed solid, to form a second solid phase on cooling. For this purpose, Bronze (Copper-Tin Alloys) of different compositions will be processed. The other project, Solidification along a Eutectic path in Ternary Alloys (SETA), looks at how two phases that form together organize into lamellar, or fibre, structures when cooling Aluminium (Copper-Silver Alloys). Both projects will provide benchmark samples that will enable to test numerical models that aim to predict these structures.
Science Results for Everyone
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The following content was provided by , and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)

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Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
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Developer(s)
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Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
European Space Agency

Research Benefits
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ISS Expedition Duration
September 2015 - March 2016; March 2016 - September 2017; September 2017 - February 2018; -

Expeditions Assigned
45/46,47/48,49/50,51/52,53/54,55/56,57/58

Previous Missions
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Experiment Description

Research Overview
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Description
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Applications

Space Applications
Industry partners to the projects seek to optimize ground processes, and have a direct interest in the knowledge that is gained from the experiments. This can, in turn, find its way into the development of new light-weight, high-performance structural materials for space applications.

Earth Applications
Materials science is an integral part of development of new materials for everyday life here on Earth. The goal of studying materials processing in space is to develop a better understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms involved. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols
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Decadal Survey Recommendations

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Results/More Information

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Related Websites

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Imagery