Early Detection of Osteoporosis in Space-2 (EDOS-2) - 02.14.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

ISS Science for Everyone

Science Objectives for Everyone
Astronauts on long-duration missions in space exhibit bone loss similar to osteoporosis. The combined Early Detection of Osteoporosis in Space-2 (EDOS-2) experiment addresses whether there is a post re-entry bone loss, and establishes when the bone lost will recover after return to Earth. Understanding the physiology of immobilization-related bone losses is paramount to the development of efficient countermeasures to microgravity induced bone loss.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Laurence Vico, Ph.D., and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Erasmus Experiment Archive.
Experiment Details

OpNom:

Principal Investigator(s)
Laurence Vico, Ph.D., LBTO INSERM, St. Etienne, France

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Herve Locrelle, Hopital Nord Service de Rhumatologie, Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France
A. Chan, Leiden University Medical Center Radiology Department, Leiden, Netherlands
Timo Jämsä, Department of Medical Technology University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
Aki Vainionpää, Oulu University Hospital Department Medical Rehabilitation, Oulu, Finland
Audrey Berthier, MEDES - Institut de Medecine et de Physiologie Spatiales, Toulouse, France
B. Koller, SCANCO Medical AG, Bruettisellen, Switzerland
Joern Rittweger, DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Köln, Germany
T. Thomsen, University of Aarhus Institute of Anatomy, Arhus, Denmark
Petra Frings-Meuthen, Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Köln, Germany
Patrick Lau, DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Köln, Germany

Developer(s)
European Space Agency (ESA), Noordwijk, Netherlands

Sponsoring Space Agency
European Space Agency (ESA)

Sponsoring Organization
Information Pending

Research Benefits
Space Exploration, Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery

ISS Expedition Duration
September 2015 - March 2016; March 2016 - September 2017; -

Expeditions Assigned
45/46,47/48,49/50,51/52,55/56,57/58

Previous Missions
Information Pending

^ back to top

Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • Astronauts exhibit bone loss similar to osteoporosis during spaceflight, approximately 1% loss per month in space. The International Space Station (ISS) is a perfect test bed for carrying out this kind of research with European Space Agency (ESA) experiments helping to uncover the mechanisms behind conditions exhibiting bone mass loss, and developing countermeasures to mitigate the effects of these conditions.
  • The combined Early Detection of Osteoporosis in Space-2 (EDOS-2) experiment addresses whether there is a post re-entry bone loss similar to that seen after bed rest (i.e. bone loss increasing in the first phase after return to earth), and hopes to establish when the bone lost will recover. Studies have shown that recovery time for bone integrity is much longer than the flight time. In order to assess these aspects, EDOS-2 assesses bone mass, geometry, and structure before and after spaceflight; as well as assess biochemical markers of bone turn-over caused by exposure to space environmental conditions. This is accompanied by dietary and activity monitoring. The lowest bone mineral content is expected to occur about 20 days after re-entry.
  • The experiment increases knowledge of the bone adaptation to spaceflight, both in flight and on return to earth, as well as its associated evolution on leg muscle mass and individual recovery potential in the long term. Understanding the physiology of immobilization-related bone losses is paramount to the development of efficient countermeasures.

Description

EDOS-2 is a combination of 2 studies:
  1. Bone recovery time course following long exposure to microgravity.
  2. The assessment of bone turn-over and bone morphology during the early phase after microgravity exposure – is there a ‘reentry bone loss’.
The present experiment has two main goals: first, to describe existence, extent, and mechanisms of post reentry bone losses (PREBL), and secondly to describe extent and mechanisms of long-term failure to recover space-flight induced bone losses.

^ back to top

Applications

Space Applications
Determining the mechanisms behind immobilization-related bone loss can help in the development of efficient of countermeasures to the bone loss experienced by astronauts on long-duration space missions, such as to the International Space Station. This assists in the future optimal planning of long-duration missions with respect to pharmacological, dietary, or exercise-based protocols in order to alleviate such adverse effects; and hence, improve/maintain the health and performance of our astronauts in orbit. This data could also feed into the development of numerical bone models for astronauts, which could further assist in the optimal planning for future longer-duration human exploration missions.

Earth Applications
With astronauts exhibiting bone loss similar to osteoporosis in space, about 1% loss per month in space, this research could help with the development of diagnostic techniques and countermeasures related to conditions involving bone mass loss on Earth.

^ back to top

Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols

  • Measurements encompass high resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) measurements (wrist and ankle), pQCT measurements (from ankle to knee), actimetry measurement, blood and urine samples, and diet log.
  • Baseline Data Collection (BDC): preflight and postflight measurements involve: a fasted blood sample, pQCT and HR pQCT taken following two-week actimetry, 4-day diet log, and 24-hour urine collection.
  • In-flight sessions involve a fasted blood sample taken following four days of actimetry, and diet logging. Blood samples are centrifuged and placed in frozen storage.
  • In-flight sessions. Prior to and including FD10, FD 20 +/-5, after R-30, and as late as possible.
  • Preflight:  2 complete sessions in the timeframe L-90 to L-15.
  • Postflight:  sessions are spread from R+0 to R+520 days, including early postflight measurement (R+0 to R+4).

^ back to top

Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

^ back to top

Results/More Information

Information Pending

^ back to top

Related Websites
EDOS 2 Information from ESA's Erasmus Experiment Database

^ back to top


Imagery