Interfacial phenomena and thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids-Fundamental research of steel processing using electrostatic levitation (Interfacial Energy 1) - 09.19.18

Overview | Description | Applications | Operations | Results | Publications | Imagery

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Science Objectives for Everyone
Reducing inclusion caused by entrapment of slag, yields an improvement of the steel-making and welding processes, but this requires clarification of the interfacial phenomena between molten steel and the oxide melts. It is also important to obtain accurate thermophysical properties, and the calculation methods of interfacial tension for improving the reliability of computer models that simulate liquid mixing. The Interfacial phenomena and thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids-Fundamental research of steel processing using electrostatic levitation (Interfacial Energy 1) investigation uses the microgravity environment, and containerless processing technology on board the International Space Station (ISS), to study the interface between molten iron and slag, contributes to materials science and industrial applications of the control process for liquid mixing.
Science Results for Everyone
Information Pending

The following content was provided by Haruka Tamaru, and is maintained in a database by the ISS Program Science Office.
Information provided courtesy of the Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA).
Experiment Details

OpNom: Interfacial Energy

Principal Investigator(s)
Masahito Watanabe, Ph.D., Gakushuin University, Japan

Co-Investigator(s)/Collaborator(s)
Akitoshi Mizuno, Ph.D., National Institute of Technology, Hakodate College, Hakodate, Japan
Takehiko Ishikawa, Ph.D., Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba, Japan
Toshihiro Tanaka, Ph.D., Osaka University, Suita, Japan
Shunpei Ozawa, Ph.D., Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Japan
Takao Tsukada, Tohoku University, Japan
Hiroyuki Fukuyama, Ph.D., Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Andreas Meyer, Ph.D., German Aerospace Center (DLR), Köln, Germany
Florian Kargl, Ph.D., German Aerospace Center (DLR), Germany
Hans J. Fecht, Ph.D., Ulm University, Ulm, Germany
Joonho Lee, Ph.D., Korea University, Seoul, South Korea
Robert W. Hyers, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, United States
Taishi Matsushita, Ph.D., Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden
Anders E. W Jarfors, Ph.D., Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden

Developer(s)
Tsukuba Space Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan

Sponsoring Space Agency
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Sponsoring Organization
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Research Benefits
Earth Benefits, Scientific Discovery, Space Exploration

ISS Expedition Duration
March 2015 - March 2016; March 2016 - April 2017; February 2018 - October 2018

Expeditions Assigned
43/44,45/46,47/48,49/50,55/56

Previous Missions
Information Pending

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Experiment Description

Research Overview

  • Keeping high interfacial tension between molten steel and slag is necessary during continuous cast processing. This experiment seeks to study ways of preventing drop-off slag particles from falling into molten steel during processing. It is necessary to measure interfacial tension and phenomena accurately, but it is difficult to make core-shell structures of liquid metal covered by oxide melts under 1-g conditions on Earth. It is also difficult to levitate and melt oxides (included slag) on Earth.
  • This research collects data on the thermophysical properties (including Interfacial tension) between molten Iron (Fe) and slag, which cannot be obtained on Earth. This research also provides observational results on interfacial vibration phenomena that occurs between molten steel and slag.
  • Containerless approaches, which use the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF), can provide data to help better understand the interfacial phenomena between the molten steel and slag system by using core-shell structure droplets. By establishing the interfacial tension measurement technique in this research, this represents a powerful tool to study the interfacial phenomena of two phase fluids on earth. The research provides insight to contribute to the precise process control for the production of high performance steels.

Description

The purpose of Interfacial phenomena and thermophysical properties of high-temperature liquids-Fundamental research of steel processing using electrostatic levitation(Interfacial Energy 1) is to clarify the interfacial phenomena between molten steel and the oxide melts, usually called slag, during the steel processing from the viewpoints of thermophysical properties of these liquids. Using an Electrostatic Levitation Furnace, the research team is able to obtain data on the density, surface tension, and viscosity of oxide melts, while also trying to obtain interfacial tension data between the molten steel and the oxide melts by using the oscillating drop technique. The research work contributes to precise process control for the production of high performance steels.
 
This experiment is carried out twice: The goal of the first trial is to acquire data on the thermophysical properties of oxides and two-phase droplets, by way of comparison of the information produced between samples produced in space and on Earth.. The goal of the second trial is to obtain data on the thermophysical properties of the two-phase droplets that cannot be obtained on Earth.
 
The first experiment is performed during Increment 43/44.

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Applications

Space Applications
Density, surface tension and viscosity control the interaction between molten steel and slag, but on Earth, gravity also contributes to the formation of impurities. This investigation uses an Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) to study the interface between molten iron and slag without gravitational effects. Researchers can obtain new data on the interface between steel and slag that they could not obtain on Earth. Results also contribute to the development of containerless processing technology for use in microgravity.

Earth Applications
Experiments in this investigation yield a new understanding of the physical properties controlling slag formation, benefiting the steel industry on Earth. They also improve the reliability of computer models that simulate liquid mixing, which are useful in many materials science and industrial applications. Results also benefit research on two-phase liquids using levitation technology.

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Operations

Operational Requirements and Protocols

This experiment is carried out twice. Samples are required to be returned in the Sample Holders.

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Decadal Survey Recommendations

Information Pending

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Results/More Information

Information Pending

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Related Websites

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Imagery