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  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    STS132-S-048 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph and Kevin O'Connell

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    STS132-S-047 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Sandra Joseph and Kevin O'Connell

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    STS132-S-046 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Tom Farrar

  • Dr. Robert M. Gates, William H. Gerstenmaier and other NASA mission managers monitor the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    STS132-S-012 (14 May 2010) --- Secretary of Defense Dr. Robert M. Gates, right, NASA Associate Administrator for Space Operations William H. Gerstenmaier, center, and other NASA mission managers monitor the launch of the space shuttle Atlantis and the STS-132 mission from Firing Room Four of the NASA Kennedy Space Center Launch Control Center, Friday, May 14, 2010 in Cape Canaveral Florida. Space shuttle Atlantis is embarking on its final planned mission. During the 12-day flight, Atlantis and six astronauts will fly to the International Space Station, leaving behind a Russian Mini Research Module, a set of batteries for the station's truss and dish antenna, along with other replacement parts. Atlantis' 32nd flight is scheduled to last 12 days and include three spacewalks and extensive robotics work. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    STS132-S-017 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo Credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    STS132-S-016 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo Credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    STS132-S-015 (14 May 2010) --- Space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo Credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    STS132-S-014 (14 May 2010) --- With visitors looking on, the space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo Credit: NASA/Ben Cooper

  • Launch of space shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    STS132-S-013 (14 May 2010) --- As visitors watch, the space shuttle Atlantis and its six-member STS-132 crew head toward Earth orbit and rendezvous with the International Space Station. Liftoff was at 2:20 p.m. (EDT) on May 14, 2010, from launch pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Onboard are NASA astronauts Ken Ham, commander; Tony Antonelli, pilot; Garrett Reisman, Michael Good, Steve Bowen and Piers Sellers, all mission specialists. The crew will deliver the Russian-built Mini-Research Module 1 (MRM-1) to the International Space Station. Named Rassvet, Russian for "dawn," the module is the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia and will be permanently attached to the Earth-facing port of the Zarya Functional Cargo Block (FGB). Rassvet will be used for cargo storage and will provide an additional docking port to the station. Also aboard Atlantis is an Integrated Cargo Carrier, or ICC, an unpressurized flat bed pallet and keel yoke assembly used to support the transfer of exterior cargo from the shuttle to the station. STS-132 is the 34th mission to the station and the last scheduled flight for Atlantis. For more information on the STS-132 mission objectives, payload and crew, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts132/index.html. Photo Credit: NASA/Ben Cooper

  • Michael Good› View High-res
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    S132-E-05113 (14 May 2010) --- NASA astronaut Michael Good, STS-132 mission specialist, wearing his ascent and entry suit, is positioned on the aft flight deck of space shuttle Atlantis on Flight Day 1. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration