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  • Astronauts Akihiko Hoshide (JAXA) and Gregory Chamitoff› View High-res
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    JSC2007-E-098648 (6 Nov. 2007) --- Astronauts Akihiko Hoshide (left foreground), STS-124 mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA); and Gregory E. Chamitoff (right), Expedition 17 flight engineer, use the virtual reality lab at Johnson Space Center to train for some of their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  • Astronaut Ronald Garan› View High-res
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    Astronaut Ronald Garan

  • Astronauts Gregory Chamitoff and Akihiko Hoshide (JAXA)› View High-res
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    JSC2007-E-098652 (6 Nov. 2007) --- Astronauts Gregory E. Chamitoff (right), Expedition 17 flight engineer; and Akihiko Hoshide, STS-124 mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), use the virtual reality lab at Johnson Space Center to train for some of their duties aboard the space shuttle and space station. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  • Astronaut Karen Nyberg› View High-res
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    JSC2007-E-097869 (26 Sept. 2007) --- Astronaut Karen L. Nyberg, mission specialist

  • The STS-124/1J patch› View High-res
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    STS124-S-001 (October 2007) --- The STS-124/1J patch depicts the Space Shuttle Discovery docked with the International Space Station (ISS). STS-124/1J is dedicated to delivering and installing the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) known as Kibo (Hope) to the ISS. The significance of the mission and the Japanese contribution to the ISS is recognized by the Japanese flag depicted on the JEM Pressurized Module (JPM) and the word Kibo written in Japanese at the bottom of the patch. The view of the sun shining down upon the Earth represents the increased "hope" that the entire world will benefit from the JEM's scientific discoveries. The JPM will be the largest habitable module on the ISS and is equipped with its own airlock and robotic arm for external experiments. In addition to delivering and installing the JPM, the STS-124 crew will relocate the JEM Logistics Pressurized (JLP) module to its permanent home on the zenith side of the JPM. During three planned space walks, the crew will perform external ISS maintenance and JPM outfitting, as well as extensive robotic operations by the ISS, space shuttle, and JEM robotic arms. It will be the first time that three different robotic arms will be operated during a single space flight mission. The NASA insignia design for shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, it will be publicly announced.

  • Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide› View High-res
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    JSC2008-E-001888 (13 Sept. 2007) --- Astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, mission specialist representing the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

  • The STS-124 crew portrait› View High-res
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    STS124-S-002 (25 Sept. 2007) --- These seven astronauts take a break from training to pose for the STS-124 crew portrait. From the left are astronauts Gregory E. Chamitoff, Michael E. Fossum, both STS-124 mission specialists; Kenneth T. Ham, pilot; Mark E. Kelly, commander; Karen L. Nyberg, Ronald J. Garan and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Akihiko Hoshide, all mission specialists. Chamitoff is scheduled to join Expedition 17 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station on mission STS-124. The crewmembers are attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits.

  • Mark E. Kelly, Ronald J. Garan, Gregory E. Chamitoff, and Michael E. Fossum participate in training session› View High-res
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    JSC2008-E-005193 (15 Jan. 2008) --- Astronauts Mark E. Kelly (standing), STS-124 commander; Ronald J. Garan (left), STS-124 mission specialist; Gregory E. Chamitoff, Expedition 17 flight engineer; and Michael E. Fossum, STS-124 mission specialist, participate in a station/shuttle emergency scenarios training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center.

  • Ronald J. Garan participates in training session› View High-res
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    JSC2008-E-005197 (15 Jan. 2008) --- Astronaut Ronald J. Garan, STS-124 mission specialist, participates in a station/shuttle emergency scenarios training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center.

  • Expedition 17 and STS-124 crewmembers participate in training session› View High-res
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    JSC2008-E-005207 (15 Jan. 2008) --- Expedition 17 and STS-124 crewmembers participate in a station/shuttle emergency scenarios training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center. Pictured in the foreground are NASA astronaut Mark E. Kelly (left), STS-124 commander; Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and NASA astronaut Karen L. Nyberg, both STS-124 mission specialists. Visible in the background are NASA astronaut Gregory E. Chamitoff (partially obscured), Expedition 17 flight engineer; Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Sergei A. Volkov (center), Expedition 17 commander; NASA astronaut Garrett E. Reisman (partially obscured) and Russian Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Oleg D. Kononenko, both flight engineers.