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  • Astronauts Robert L. Behnken and Mike Foreman› View High-res
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    S123-E-007838 (21 March 2008) --- Astronauts Robert L. Behnken (top) and Mike Foreman, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and Foreman replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  • Astronauts Mike Foreman and Robert L. Behnken› View High-res
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    S123-E-007839 (21 March 2008) --- Astronauts Mike Foreman (foreground) and Robert L. Behnken, both STS-123 mission specialists, participate in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Foreman and Behnken replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  • Astronaut Robert L. Behnken› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    S123-E-007906 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  • Astronaut Robert L. Behnken› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    S123-E-007907 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  • Astronaut Robert L. Behnken› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    S123-E-007909 (21 March 2008) --- Astronaut Robert L. Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's fourth scheduled session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the 6-hour, 24-minute spacewalk, Behnken and astronaut Mike Foreman (out of frame), mission specialist, replaced a failed Remote Power Control Module -- essentially a circuit breaker -- on the station's truss. The spacewalkers also tested a repair method for damaged heat resistant tiles on the space shuttle. This technique used a caulk-gun-like tool named the Tile Repair Ablator Dispenser to dispense a material called Shuttle Tile Ablator-54 into purposely damaged heat shield tiles. The sample tiles will be returned to Earth to undergo extensive testing on the ground.

  • A full moon› View High-res
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    S123-E-007971 (21 March 2008) --- A full moon is featured in this image photographed by a STS-123 crewmember onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour while docked with the International Space Station.

  • Various components of the International Space Station› View High-res
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    S123-E-007976 (21 March 2008) --- Various components of the International Space Station are photographed by a STS-123 crewmember on Space Shuttle Endeavour while docked with the International Space Station. Pictured are partial views of the Columbus laboratory (bottom), starboard truss and solar array panels. Airglow above Earth's horizon and the blackness of space provide the backdrop for the scene.

  • The glowing green beauty of the Aurora Borealis› View High-res
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    STS123-E-008018 (21 March 2008) --- While docked and onboard the International Space Station, a STS-123 Endeavour crewmember captured the glowing green beauty of the Aurora Borealis. Looking northward across the Gulf of Alaska, over a low pressure area (cloud vortex), the aurora brightens the night sky. This image was taken on March 21, 2008 at 09:08:46 (GMT) with a 28 mm lens from the nadir point of 47.9 degrees north latitude and 146.8 degreees west longitude.