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  • Astronaut Alan Poindexter› View High-res
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    S122-E-007166 (9 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Alan Poindexter, STS-122 pilot, prepares to use a High Definition Video (HDV) camera, a Station Detailed Test Objective (SDTO), on the flight deck of Space Shuttle Atlantis during flight day three activities.

  • Astronaut Stanley Love› View High-res
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    S122-E-007176 (9 Feb. 2008) --- Astronaut Stanley Love, STS-122 mission specialist, works on the aft flight deck of Space Shuttle Atlantis during flight day three activities.

  • International Space Station› View High-res
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    S122-E-007026 (9 Feb. 2008) --- This digital still image of the International Space Station was photographed through an overhead window on the Space Shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft approached each other for a Feb. 9 docking. While STS-122 astronauts were recording photos of their home for the next several days, crew members aboard the ISS were clicking images of the shuttle, with the primary focus being on its thermal protection system.

  • The International Space Station› View High-res
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    S122-E-007027 (9 Feb. 2008) --- This digital still image of the International Space Station was photographed through an overhead window on the Space Shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft approached each other for a Feb. 9 docking. While STS-122 astronauts were recording photos of their home for the next several days, crew members aboard the ISS were clicking images of the shuttle, with the primary focus being on its thermal protection system.

  • The Space Shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS016-E-028403 (9 Feb. 2008) --- An overhead view of the exterior of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' crew cabin, part of its payload bay doors and docking system was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.

  • The nose and underside of the Space Shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS016-E-028420 (9 Feb. 2008) --- A low angle view of the nose and underside of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' crew cabin was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.

  • The Space Shuttle Atlantis' starboard wing› View High-res
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    ISS016-E-028518 (9 Feb. 2008) --- An overhead view of part of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' starboard wing and part of its orbital maneuvering system pods was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.

  • The Space Shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS016-E-028521 (9 Feb. 2008) --- An overhead view of the exterior of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' crew cabin and docking system was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.

  • The Space Shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
    › View Low-res

    ISS016-E-028523 (9 Feb. 2008) --- An overhead view of the exterior of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' crew cabin and docking system was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.

  • The Columbus laboratory in the Space Shuttle Atlantis› View High-res
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    ISS016-E-028524 (9 Feb. 2008) --- An overhead view of the European Space Agency's Columbus laboratory in Space Shuttle Atlantis' cargo bay was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers. Before docking with the International Space Station, astronaut Steve Frick, STS-122 commander, flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver or basically a backflip to allow the space station crew a good view of Atlantis' heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the ISS crewmembers took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them down to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image.