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Patrick Forrester participates in EVA+ View High-res
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ISS015-E-12018 (13 June 2007) --- Anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, astronaut Patrick Forrester, STS-117 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and astronaut Steven Swanson (out of frame), mission specialist, removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction.
Patrick Forrester participates in second EVA of STS-117+ View High-res
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ISS015-E-12026 (13 June 2007) --- Anchored to a foot restraint on the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) or Canadarm2, astronaut Patrick Forrester, STS-117 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and astronaut Steven Swanson (out of frame), mission specialist, removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction. Space Shuttle Atlantis docked to the station is visible at left.
Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester participate in EVA+ View High-res
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ISS015-E-12063 (13 June 2007) --- Astronauts Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester (out of frame), both STS-117 mission specialists, participate in the mission's second planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA), as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Among other tasks, Forrester and Swanson removed all of the launch locks holding the 10-foot-wide solar alpha rotary joint in place and began the solar array retraction.
Stapler similar to the one from a medical kit+ View High-res
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JSC2007-E-29519 (13 June 2007) --- An archival photo of a stapler similar to the one from a medical kit which will be used on a scheduled June 15 spacewalk to repair damage to the thermal blanket on Atlantis' port orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod. . Astronaut John (Danny) Olivas, STS-117 mission specialist, has been assigned the task of using the stapler and other gear to re-secure the damaged area during a scheduled June 15 spacewalk.
Dry run of a task to repair damage to the thermal blanket+ View High-res
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JSC2007-E-29520 (13 June 2007) --- In the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center, an engineer reveals the results of a "dry run" of a task to repair damage to the thermal blanket on the port orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Special staples inserted by a stapler from a medical kit represent the chosen means to fix the damage, which was discovered on launch day. Astronaut John (Danny) Olivas, STS-117 mission specialist, has been assigned the task of replicating this procedure on a scheduled June 15 spacewalk.
Rehearsal of technique to repair damage to the thermal blanket+ View High-res
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JSC2007-E-29521 (13 June 2007) --- In the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center, a stand-in astronaut uses a stapler from a medical kit to rehearse the selected technique to repair damage to the thermal blanket on the port orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod of the Space Shuttle Atlantis. Astronaut John (Danny) Olivas, STS-117 mission specialist, has been assigned the task of replicating this procedure on a scheduled June 15 spacewalk.
An astronaut rehearses the planned fix on an exposed area on the thermal protection system+ View High-res
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JSC2007-E-28584 (13 June 2007) --- In the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center, an astronaut (out of frame) rehearses the planned "fix" on an exposed area on the thermal protection system on Atlantis' aft. The STS-117 Mission Management Team (MMT) has decided the best course of action to take in regard to the uplifted thermal blanket on the post side Orbital Maneuvering System Pod was to add the repair task on EVA 3 with astronauts Jim Reilly and John (Danny) Olivas. In the words of John Shannon, chairman of the MMT, during a June 13 mission status briefing: "The repair method chosen is when the astronaut gets out there on the RMS is this--he'll pat down the blanket using his hands or a scraper tool. These blankets are very formable -- they will take the shape you put them in and pretty much stay there." Shannon continued, "The next step is to put a double row of staples in -- these are not your average office supply staples. As the staple goes in, it has hooks that go into the surface and provide a very tight bond. It's stainless steel, which holds its shape and provides heat resistance. Then we'll use a nickel chromium pin to attach the blanket to the tile -- they're very good at going into tile." Finally, Shannon added "They'll take a dental probe tool to score the tile then push the pin into the scored area. With that tool and that pin, we think we'll be able to secure the front of the blanket to the tile and make sure no air flow gets in."
An astronaut rehearses the planned fix on an exposed area on the thermal protection system+ View High-res
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JSC2007-E-28623 (13 June 2007) --- In the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center, an astronaut (out of frame) rehearses the planned "fix" on an exposed area on the thermal protection system on Atlantis' aft. The STS-117 Mission Management Team (MMT) has decided the best course of action to take in regard to the uplifted thermal blanket on the post side Orbital Maneuvering System Pod was to add the repair task on EVA 3 with astronauts Jim Reilly and John (Danny) Olivas. In the words of John Shannon, chairman of the MMT, during a June 13 mission status briefing: "The repair method chosen is when the astronaut gets out there on the RMS is this--he'll pat down the blanket using his hands or a scraper tool. These blankets are very formable -- they will take the shape you put them in and pretty much stay there." Shannon continued, "The next step is to put a double row of staples in -- these are not your average office supply staples. As the staple goes in, it has hooks that go into the surface and provide a very tight bond. It's stainless steel, which holds its shape and provides heat resistance. Then we'll use a nickel chromium pin to attach the blanket to the tile -- they're very good at going into tile." Finally, Shannon added "They'll take a dental probe tool to score the tile then push the pin into the scored area. With that tool and that pin, we think we'll be able to secure the front of the blanket to the tile and make sure no air flow gets in."
Astronaut Steven Swanson, STS-117 mission specialist+ View High-res
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S117-E-07165 (13 June 2007) --- Attired in his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) spacesuit, astronaut Steven Swanson, STS-117 mission specialist, prepares for the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in the Quest Airlock of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the station.
Astronaut Steven Swanson, STS-117 mission specialist+ View High-res
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S117-E-07173 (13 June 2007) --- Attired in his extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) spacesuit, astronaut Steven Swanson, STS-117 mission specialist, moves through a hatch in the Quest Airlock of the International Space Station as the second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) is about to begin while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the station.