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+ NASA Home > Mission Sections > Space Shuttle > Shuttle Missions > STS-116 > Multimedia > Fd3

    IMAGE OF THE DAY ARCHIVE
 
Astronaut Joan Higginbotham, STS-116 mission specialist+ View High-res
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S116-E-05575 (11 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Joan E. Higginbotham, STS-116 mission specialist, uses a computer on the middeck of Space Shuttle Discovery during flight day three activities. 
Astronaut Sunita Williams and Joan Higginbotham, both STS-116 mission specialists+ View High-res
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S116-E-05579 (11 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Sunita L. Williams (left) and Joan E. Higginbotham, both STS-116 mission specialists, float arm-in-arm near Space Shuttle Discovery's hatch, which leads into the International Space Station. Rendezvous and docking operations between the shuttle and station occurred at 4:12 p.m. (CST) and the crew entered the orbital outpost at 5:54 p.m. (CST) on Dec. 11. 
The Space Shuttle Discovery and Expedition 14 crewmembers+ View High-res
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S116-E-05586 (11 Dec. 2006) --- The Space Shuttle Discovery and Expedition 14 crewmembers enjoy a light moment in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station following rendezvous and docking operations between the shuttle and station. Pictured in the foreground (left to right) are astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 14 commander and NASA space station science officer; European Space Agency (ESA) astronauts Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist; and Thomas Reiter, Expedition 14 flight engineer. Pictured in the background are astronauts Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., STS-116 mission specialist; Mark L. Polansky, STS-116 commander; William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot; Joan E. Higginbotham and Sunita L. Williams, both STS-116 mission specialists. 
Astronaut William Oefelein, STS-116 pilot+ View High-res
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S116-E-05602 (11 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut William A. (Bill) Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, floats through the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the station. 
Astronaut Mark Polansky, STS-116 commander+ View High-res
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S116-E-05605 (11 Dec. 2006) --- Astronaut Mark L. Polansky, STS-116 commander, floats in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the station. 
European Space Agency astronauts Thomas Reiter and Christer Fuglesang+ View High-res
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S116-E-05609 (11 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronauts Thomas Reiter (left), Expedition 14 flight engineer, and Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, discuss an approaching task in the International Space Station following a successful rendezvous and docking between the station and shuttle. 
European Space Agency astronauts Thomas Reiter and Christer Fuglesang+ View High-res
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S116-E-05610 (11 Dec. 2006) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronauts Thomas Reiter (left), Expedition 14 flight engineer, and Christer Fuglesang, STS-116 mission specialist, exchange greetings in the International Space Station following a successful rendezvous and docking between the station and shuttle. 
The International Space Station+ View High-res
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S116-E-05627 (11 Dec. 2006) --- The International Space Station was photographed by one of the STS-116 crewmembers as Space Shuttle Discovery approached the station during rendezvous and docking activities on flight day three. 
The new P5 truss section is moved out of the shuttle's payload bay+ View High-res
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S116-E-05750 (11 Dec. 2006) --- The International Space Station's new P5 truss section is moved out of Space Shuttle Discovery's payload bay by a cabin-bound STS-116 crewmember, using the shuttle's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm. The truss section will be handed to the station's Canadarm2 and will remain suspended over Discovery's port wing overnight, awaiting installation in the first of three planned spacewalks on Dec. 12. 
The Canadarm2 moves toward the station's new P5 truss section+ View High-res
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S116-E-05764 (11 Dec. 2006) --- The International Space Station's Canadarm2 moves toward the station's new P5 truss section for a hand-off from Space Shuttle Discovery's Remote Manipulator System (RMS) robotic arm. 
 
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