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05-20-2011
May 20, 2011
 
ISS On-Orbit Status 05/20/11

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.   FE-3 Ron Garan continues on his special Shuttle-crew sleep-cycle schedule:  Wake – 10:26pm last night; Sleep – 12:56pm-9:26pm today.

Mission ULF-6’s EVA-1 was completed successfully by EV1 Greg Chamitoff & EV2 Drew Feustel in 6h 19m, accomplishing all objectives. Beginning this morning at 3:10am EDT, the spacewalk ended at 9:29am. [EV1 & EV2 began their “campout” yesterday around noon in the U.S. Airlock (A/L) at ~12:51pm with hatch closure and depressurization of the Crewlock (CL) from 14.7 to 10.2 psi, followed by mask prebreathe (~12:51pm-1:36pm) and sleep from 2:26pm-10:26pm. After wake-up at nighttime and the usual hygiene break/with mask prebreathe for Taz & Drew at 11:01pm-12:11am, the A/L hatch was closed again by Ron Garan & Mark Kelly for EVA preps in 10.2 psi (12:11am-1:41am), followed by EMU purge (1:41am-1:56am) and prebreathe in the EMUs (1:56am-2:46am). Afterwards, with CL depressurization and EV1/EV2 switching to suit power, EVA-1 began at 3:10am. The excursion lasted 6h 19m.]

During EVA-1, Greg & Drew –
  • Retrieved the MISSE-7A & 7B experiments from ELC-2 (Express Logistics Carrier 2),
  • Installed the MISSE-8 experiment
  • Installed segment S3 CETA (Crew Equipment Translation Aid) light,
  • Installed a cover (#7) on the Stbd SARJ,
  • Installed NH3 (ammonia) refill jumpers between segments P3-P4, P5-P6, P6-EAS (Early Ammonia Server) on the left-side truss;
  • Stowed the P4 NH3 jumper,
  • Connected P3-P4, P1-P2 & P16A/J16A,
  • Vented nitrogen from NH3 server;
  • Reconfigured the QD (quick disconnect) tool bag,
  • Installed EWC (External Wireless Communication) antenna on US Lab for comm to the truss-mounted ELCs, and
  • Cleaned up.

Due to a CO2 (carbon dioxide) sensor failure in Chamitoff’s spacesuit, the EVA was shortened by ~10 min by Flight Rule, so the mating of some of the connectors for the wireless communications equipment could not be completed this time.

Before today’s spacewalk, FE-6 Coleman performed a final test on the two NIKON D2Xs EVA cameras for Taz & Drew.

After the EVA, activities by Mark, Taz, Greg, Ron & Cady included the usual post-EVA tasks like photographing EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) gloves for inspection, recharging EMUs with water, downloading & downlinking D2XS EVA & glove photographs, recharging REBA (Rechargeable EVA Battery Assembly) batteries, etc.

First thing in post-sleep, prior to eating, drinking & brushing teeth, Cady Coleman performed her 2nd liquid saliva collection of the INTEGRATED IMMUNE protocol (Day 2). The collections are made every other day for six days. [INTEGRATED IMMUNE (Validating Procedures for Monitoring Crew member Immune Function) samples & analyzes participant’s blood, urine, and saliva before, during and after flight for changes related to functions like bone metabolism, oxidative damage and immune function to develop and validate an immune monitoring strategy consistent with operational flight requirements and constraints. The strategy uses both long and short duration crewmembers as study subjects. The saliva is collected in two forms, dry and liquid. The dry samples are collected at intervals during the collection day using a specialized book that contains filter paper. The liquid saliva collections require that the crewmembers soak a piece of cotton inside their mouths and place it in a salivette bag; there are four of the liquid collections during docked operations. The on-orbit blood samples are collected right before undocking and returned to the ground so that analysis can occur with 48 hours of the sampling. This allows assays that quantify the function of different types of white blood cells and other active components of the immune system. Samples are secured in the MELFI (Minus-Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS). Also included are entries in a fluid/medications intact log, and a stress-test questionnaire to be filled out by the subject at begin and end. Urine is collected during a 24-hour period, conventionally divided into two twelve-hour phases: morning-evening and evening-morning.]

FE-3 Garan, FE-5 Nespoli & FE-6 Coleman completed another post-sleep session of the Reaction Self Test (Psychomotor Vigilance Self Test on the ISS) protocol. It was the 11th for Ron, the 34th for Paolo & Cady. [RST is done twice daily (after wakeup & before bedtime) for 3 days prior to the sleep shift, the day(s) of the sleep shift and 5 days following a sleep shift. The experiment consists of a 5-minute reaction time task that allows crewmembers to monitor the daily effects of fatigue on performance while on ISS. The experiment provides objective feedback on neurobehavioral changes in attention, psychomotor speed, state stability, and impulsivity while on ISS missions, particularly as they relate to changes in circadian rhythms, sleep restrictions, and extended work shifts.]

At ~8:00am EDT, Borisenko, Garan & Samokutyayev joined up for a one-hour Crew Emergency Roles & Responsibilities Review (peredacha smeniy po bezopasnosti), to familiarize them with procedures and escape routes in case of an emergency, and to clarify emergency roles & responsibilities for the crew change ahead. Borisenko, Kondratyev’s successor as CDR for the upcoming Increment 28, went through formally listed procedures in discussing the ISS prime to non-prime crew emergency roles & responsibility agreements established during ground training.

Dmitri Kondratyev used the standard ECOSFERA equipment, set up yesterday, to inspect and evaluate the samples collected earlier for the MedOps SZM-MO-21 microbial experiment in Media 2 Petri dishes for cultivation. Afterwards, Dima recharged the experiment’s battery and then set up the equipment for more sampling overnight. [The equipment, consisting of an air sampler set, a charger and power supply unit, provides samples to help determine microbial contamination of the ISS atmosphere, specifically the total bacterial and fungal microflora counts and microflora composition according to morphologic criteria of microorganism colonies.]

Dmitri also checked out proper communications between the BSPN Payload Server and the RSS1 laptop, and then downloaded data accumulated from the GFI-7 Molniya-GAMMA experiment mounted externally since the Russian EVA-28 .    [GFI-17Molniya” FOTON-GAMMA investigates atmospheric gamma-ray bursts and optical radiation in conditions of thunderstorm activity.]

In the Soyuz 25S, Dima removed Container #1 in the BO/Orbital Module and checked out the LDI-11 laser range finder, to be used during the post-undock ISS imaging session.

Collecting air samples for return on 25S, Alex Samokutyayev used a Russian AK-1M absorber in the SM & FGB for air and IPD-CO Draeger tubes, on a cartridge belt with a pump, to check the SM cabin air for CO (carbon monoxide) and subsequently also for NH3 (ammonia).

Both Aleksandr & Andrey took the monthly O-OHA (On-Orbit Hearing Assessment) test, a 30-min NASA environmental health systems examination to assess the efficacy of acoustic countermeasures, using a special software application on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) laptop.   [The O-OHA audiography test involves minimum audibility measurements for each ear over a wide range of frequencies (0.25-10 kHz) and sound pressure levels, with the crewmembers using individual-specific Prophonics earphones, new Bose ANC headsets (delivered on 30P) and the SLM (sound level meter). To conduct the testing, the experimenter is supported by special EarQ software on the MEC, featuring an up/down-arrow-operated slider for each test frequency that the crewmember moves to the lowest sound pressure level at which the tone can still be heard. The baseline test is required not later than about Flight Day 14 for each new Expedition and is then generally performed once per month. Note: There has been temporary hearing deficits documented on some U.S. and Russian crewmembers, all of which recovered to pre-mission levels.]

Samokutyayev configured the Russian MBI-21 PNEVMOKARD experiment, then conducted the 1h15m session, his first, which forbids moving or talking during data recording. The experiment is controlled from the RSE-med A31p laptop and uses the TENZOPLUS sphygmomanometer to measure arterial blood pressure. The experiment was then closed out and the test data were downlinked via OCA. [PNEVMOKARD (Pneumocard) attempts to obtain new scientific information to refine the understanding about the mechanisms used by the cardiorespiratory system and the whole body organism to spaceflight conditions. By recording (on PCMCIA cards) the crewmember’s electrocardiogram, impedance cardiogram, low-frequency phonocardiogram (seismocardiogram), pneumotachogram (using nose temperature sensors), and finger photoplethismogram, the experiment supports integrated studies of (1) the cardiovascular system and its adaptation mechanisms in various phases of a long-duration mission, (2) the synchronization of heart activity and breathing factors, as well as the cardiorespiratory system control processes based on the variability rate of physiological parameters, and (3) the interconnection between the cardiorespiratory system during a long-duration mission and the tolerance of orthostatic & physical activities at the beginning of readaptation for predicting possible reactions of the crewmembers organism during the their return to ground.]

Activities completed by FE-2 Andrey Borisenko included –
  • The periodic checkout & performance verification of IP-1 airflow sensors in the various RS hatchways [inspected IP-1s are in the passageways PrK (SM Transfer Tunnel)–RO (SM Working Compartment), PkhO (SM Transfer Compartment)–RO, PkhO–DC1, PkhO–FGB PGO, PkhO-MRM2, FGB PGO–FGB GA, and FGB GA–Node-1. This checkup is especially important now when the ventilation/circulation system has to cope with a larger crew on board, currently twelve persons],
  • The daily monitoring of the running Russian TEKh-15/DAKON-M IZGIB (“Bend”) experiment in the SM (Service)  which is taking structural dynamics data during the Shuttle docked phase. The data were later copied from the BUSD Control & Data Gathering Unit to a USB-D-M-3 stick for downlink to the ground. The BUSD archive was then deleted and the DAKON-M restarted,  [IZGIB has the objective to help update mathematical models of the ISS gravitation environment, using accelerometers of the Russian SBI Onboard Measurement System, the GIVUS high-accuracy angular rate vector gyrometer of the SUDN Motion Control & Navigation System and other accelerometers for unattended measurement of micro-accelerations at science hardware accommodation locations - (1) in operation of onboard equipment having rotating parts (gyrodynes, fans), (2) when establishing and keeping various ISS attitude modes, and (3) when performing crew egresses into space and physical exercises],
  • Conducting the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur), and
  • Performing the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM [regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

Aleksandr removed the ID-ZMKS dosimeter assemblies of the RBO-3-4 Matryoshka radiation payload in the Stbd Kabin (crew quarters) on the RL protective curtain, and Andrey later initialized & deployed RBO-3-2 Matryoshka-R bubble dosimeters in the RS (Russian Segment).

At ~1:36pm EDT, Paolo Nespoli conducted another VHF-1 emergency communications proficiency check over NASA’s VHF (Very High Frequency) stations, today with the VHF sites at Wallops (1:38:04pm-1:44:41pm), for a voice check with Houston/Capcom, MSFC/PAYCOM (Payload Operation & Integration Center Communicator), Moscow/GLAVNI (TsUP Capcom), EUROCOM/Munich and JCOM/Tsukuba in the normal fashion via VHF radio from a handheld microphone and any of the USOS ATUs (Audio Terminal Units). [Purpose of the test is to verify signal reception and link integrity, improve crew proficiency, and ensure minimum required link margin during emergency (no TDRS) and special events (such as a Soyuz relocation).]

FE-5 also checked the FIR (Fluids Integrated Rack) to verify that 3 of the 4 alignment guides are properly installed (none in the lower left corner).

FE-6 Coleman performed ACO (Activation & Checkout) on the newly resupplied CSA-CP (Compound Specific Analyzer-Combustion Products) units, verifying that the sensors are not contaminated and then zero-calibrating them for use on ISS.

Cady also completed the visual T+2 Days (44 ± 4h) microbial (bacterial & fungal) analysis of SM & PWD (Potable Water Dispenser) water samples collected by her on 5/18, using the WMK MCD (Water Microbiology Kit / Microbial Capture Devices) for microbial traces, and the CDB (Coliform Detection Bag) for inflight coliform indications (Magenta for Positive, Yellow for Negative).

Later, Coleman configured the C&T (Command & -Tracking) video set-up in Node-2, verifying that the video cap was installed which enables pass-through reception of video from the Endeavour with the Orbiter docked in support of SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) ops during crew sleep.

With CDR Kondratyev’s stay on the ISS approaching its end with Soyuz 25S return on 5/23, Dmitri spent ~1h with Andrey, the Exp-28 CDR, on handover activities.

At ~3:31am, Dmitri, Alex, Andrey, Paolo & Cady held the regular (nominally weekly) tagup with the Russian Flight Control Team (GOGU/Glavnaya operativnaya gruppa upravleniya), including Shift Flight Director (SRP), at TsUP-Moscow via S-band/audio, phone-patched from Houston and Moscow.

At ~3:46pm, Alex Samokutyayev & Andrey Borisenko linked up with TsUP/Moscow stowage specialists via S-band to conduct the weekly IMS tagup, discussing inventory & stowage issues, equipment locations and cargo transfers.

Kondratyev, Nespoli & Coleman had another hour each set aside for personal crew departure preparations; these are standard pre-return procedures for crewmembers.

Sasha & Andrey spent ~1hr on shooting more newsreel footage using the SONY HVR-Z7 #2 high-definition camcorder as part of the ongoing effort to create a photo & video imagery database on the flight of ISS-27/28 (“Flight Chronicles”), focusing on onboard activities and payload scenes. [Footage subjects generally include life on the station, personal hygiene, food intake, playing with water, enjoying weightlessness, exercise, moving about, station interior, Earth surface, space clothing, cosmonaut at work, station cleaning, etc. The photo/video imagery is saved digitally on HDDs (Hard Disk Drives) for return to Earth on Soyuz.]

In the COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), FE-6 Coleman purged & filled a spare ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) coolant sampling adapter and then retrieved an RTG (Return-to-Ground) sample from the COL TCS loop.

Cady also performed the weekly 10-min. CWC (Contingency Water Container) inventory as part of the on-going WRM (Water Recovery & Management) assessment of onboard water supplies. Updated “cue cards” based on the crew’s water calldowns are sent up every other week for recording changes. [The current card (27-0041H) lists 113 CWCs (2,169.7 L total) for the five types of water identified on board: 1. technical water (10 CWCs with 392.0 L, for Elektron electrolysis, incl. 87.0 L in 3 bags containing Wautersia bacteria and 134.2 L in 3 clean bags for contingency use; 2. Silver potable water (no CWCs); 3. iodinated water (91 CWCs with 1,668.3 L for reserve (also 14 expired bags with 251.5 L); 4. condensate water (76.6 L in 5 bags, plus 5 empty bags); and 5. waste/EMU dump and other (32.8 L in 2 CWCs from hose/pump flush). Wautersia bacteria are typical water-borne microorganisms that have been seen previously in ISS water sources. These isolates pose no threat to human health.]

The crew worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise protocol on the CEVIS cycle ergometer with vibration isolation (FE-3), ARED advanced resistive exercise device (FE-2, FE-3, FE-5, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR/2x, FE-1, FE-2, FE-5, FE-6) and VELO ergometer bike with load trainer (FE-1).

No CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uplinked for today.

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 8:57am EDT [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 343.8 km
Apogee height – 345.9 km
Perigee height – 341.6 km
Period -- 91.41 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.65 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0003235
Solar Beta Angle -- -28.1 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.75
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours -- 225 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 71,655

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/23/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S undock – 5:25pm EDT (End of Increment 27)
    • ISS Photography Flyabout – 5:50pm
    • ISS in photography attitude – 6:06pm
    • Soyuz TMA-20/25S deorbit burn – 9:36pm
05/23/11 -- Soyuz TMA-20/25S landing – 10:27pm (8:27am local on 5/24)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour undock – 11:53pm
06/01/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour landing – ~2:32am
06/07/11 -- Soyuz TMA-02M/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/09/11 -- Soyuz TMA-02M/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/xx/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
06/28/11 -- STS-135/Endeavour launch ULF7 (MPLM) ~3:30pm EDT NET
06/30/11 -- STS-135/Endeavour docking ULF7 (MPLM) NET
07/27/11 – Russian EVA #29
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-03M/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-02M/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
02/29/12 -- ATV3 launch readiness
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-03M/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Volkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/05/12 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – launch on Proton (under review)
05/06/12 -- Progress M-14M/46P undock
05/07/12 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) – docking (under review)
05/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-04M/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-06M/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-06M/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/18/12 -- Soyuz TMA-05M/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
10/02/12 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O.Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
10/04/12 – Soyuz TMA-07M/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-06M/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-08M/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
12/02/12 – Soyuz TMA-08M/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/13 -- Soyuz TMA-07M/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/34S launch – P.Vinogradov (CDR-36)/C.Cassidy/A.Misurkin
03/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-08M/33S undock/landing (End of Increment 35)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/35S launch – M.Suraev (CDR-37)/K.Nyberg/L.Parmitano
05/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/35S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-09M/34S undock/landing (End of Increment 36)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/36S launch – M.Hopkins/TBD (CDR-38)/TBD
09/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-11M/36S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-10M/35S undock/landing (End of Increment 37)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-12M/37S launch – K.Wakata (CDR-39)/R.Mastracchio/TBD
11/xx/13 – Soyuz TMA-12M/37S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/14 – Soyuz TMA-11M/36S undock/landing (End of Increment 38)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------