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02-02-2011
February 02, 2011
 
ISS On-Orbit Status 02/02/11

All ISS systems continue to function nominally, except those noted previously or below.

FE-4 Kondratyev conducted the regular daily early-morning check of the aerosol filters at the Russian Elektron O2 generator which Maxim Suraev had installed on 10/19/09 in gaps between the BZh Liquid Unit and the oxygen outlet pipe (filter FA-K) plus hydrogen outlet pipe (filter FA-V). [Before sleeptime, Dmitri will inspect the filters again, currently a daily requirement per plan, with photographs to be taken if the filter packing is discolored.]

At wake-up, FE-1 Kaleri terminated his 10th experiment session, started last night, for the long-term Russian sleep study MBI-12/Sonokard, taking the recording device from his Sonokard sports shirt pocket and later copying the measurements to the RSE-Med laptop for subsequent downlink to the ground. [Sonokard objectives are stated to (1) study the feasibility of obtaining the maximum of data through computer processing of records obtained overnight, (2) systematically record the crewmember’s physiological functions during sleep, (3) study the feasibility of obtaining real-time crew health data. Investigators believe that contactless acquisition of cardiorespiratory data over the night period could serve as a basis for developing efficient criteria for evaluating and predicting adaptive capability of human body in long-duration space flight.]

FE-5 Nespoli continued his 3rd (FD60) suite of sessions with the medical protocol Pro K (Dietary Intake Can Predict and Protect against Changes in Bone Metabolism during Spaceflight and Recovery), with diet logging after the urine pH spot test, for a 5-day period. [For Pro K, there will be five in-flight sessions (FD15, FD30, FD60, FD120, FD180) of samplings, to be shared with the NUTRITION w/Repository protocol, each one with five days of diet & urine pH logging and photography on the last day. The crewmember prepares a diet log and then annotates quantities of food packets consumed and supplements taken. Urine collections are spread over 24 hrs; samples go into the MELFI (Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS) within 30 min after collection. Blood samples, on the last day, are centrifuged in the RC (Refrigerated Centrifuge) and placed in MELFI at -80 degC. There is an 8-hr fasting requirement prior to the blood draw (i.e., no food or drink, but water ingestion is encouraged). MELFI constraints: Maximum MELFI dewar open time: 60 sec; at least 45 min between MELFI dewar door openings.]

CDR Kelly performed the periodic (approx. weekly) WRS (Water Recovery System) sampling in Node-3 using the TOCA (Total Organic Carbon Analyzer), after first initializing the software and priming (filling) the TOCA water sample hose. [After the approximately 2 hr TOCA analysis, results were transferred to the SSC-5 (Station Support Computer 5) laptop via USB drive for downlink, and the data were also logged.]

Later, Kelly completed the periodic routine replacement of the RFTA (Recycle Filter Tank Assembly). Scott then reconfigured the WHC (Waste & Hygiene Compartment) to feed the UPA (Urine Processor Assembly) directly for processing. [RFTAs collect the substances cleaned from the pretreated urine by the UPA as it turns it into water. HTV2 delivered two new RFTAs, of which one was installed today. This allows resuming nominal WHC/UPA operations, feeding urine directly to the UPA for processing as required. If launch dates hold for ULF-5 and/or ATV-2 with more RFTAs, these nominal ops can be continued for the foreseeable future.]

After battery charging, Alex Kaleri installed and started the equipment of the GFI-1 “Relaksatsiya” (Relaxation) Earth Observation experiment at SM (Service Module) window #9 and then used it to observe & measure lightning storm emissions in the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Later, the equipment was dismantled again. [Using the GFI-1 UFKFialka-MV-Kosmos” ultraviolet camera, SP spectrometer and SONY HVR-Z7 HD (High Definition) camcorder, the experiment observes the Earth atmosphere and surface from window #9, with spectrometer measurements controlled from Laptop 3. “Relaxation”, in Physics, is the transition of an atom or molecule from a higher energy level to a lower one, emitting radiative energy in the process as equilibrium is achieved.]

Oleg Skripochka charged the batteries of the Russian GFI-8 "Uragan" (hurricane) earth-imaging program with FSS science hardware, then set up the equipment. [The FSS system consists of an image recording module with lens and a spectroradiometer module with an electronics module. For tomorrow’s scheduled session, Oleg charged and checked the ME/Electronics Module & MRI/Image Recording Module batteries and also set up the FSS science hardware near window #9.]

Dmitri Kondratyev completed his 3rd session with the Russian behavioral assessment TIPOLOGIA (MBI-20), setting up the workstation, connecting equipment, suiting up and launching the program on the RSK1 laptop. [Skripochka assisted Dima in donning the electrode cap, preparing the head for the electrodes, applying electrode gel from the Neurolab-RM2 kit and taking documentary photography. Data were recorded on a PCMCIA memory card and downlinked via OCA comm. MBI-20 studies typological features of operator activity of the ISS crews in long-term space flight phases, with the subject using a cap with EEG (electroencephalogram) electrodes. The experiment, which records EEGs, consists of the Lüscher test, “adaptive biological control” training, and the games Minesweeper and Tetris. The Lüscher color diagnostic is a psychological test which measures a person's psychophysical state, his/her ability to withstand stress, to perform and to communicate. It is believed to help uncover the cause of psychological stress, which can lead to physical symptoms. An EEG measures and records the electrical activity of the brain.]

FE-5 Nespoli initiated another sampling run with the EHS GC/DMS (Environmental Health Systems Gas Chromatograph / Differential Mobility Spectrometer); deactivating the system ~5 hrs later. [This was the 15th session with the replaced GC/DMS unit #1004, after the previous instrument (#1002) was used for approximately 7 runs. Also known as AQM (Air Quality Monitor), the system is controlled with “Sionex” expert software from the SSC (Station Support Computer)-12 laptop (due to a software glitch, the software needs to be opened, closed, and then reopened in order to ensure good communication between GC/DMS and SSC-12). The AQM demonstrates COTS (Commercial Off-the-Shelf) technology for identifying volatile organic compounds, similar to the VOA (Volatile Organics Analyzer). This evaluation will continue over the course of several months as it helps to eventually certify the GC/DMS as nominal CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) hardware.]

Afterwards, Paolo performed routine maintenance on the CSA-CP (Compound Specific Analyzer-Combustion Products) prime unit (#1058) by replacing its battery with a new one, then zero-calibrating all units. [CSA-CP is a passive cabin atmosphere monitor that provides quick response capability during a combustion event (fire). Its collected data are stored on a logger. Following zero calibration, the prime unit was re-deployed at the SM Central Post.]

After yesterday’s preliminary work on the new GHF (Gradient Heating Furnace), part of the HTV2-delivered JAXA Kobairo (“stork”) rack, FE-6 Coleman removed the MP (Materials Processing) front panel, opened the MP access door and removed two mechanical stoppers from the heating units inside. The access door was then re-closed. [GHF is a vacuum furnace that contains three heating blocks. Their positions and temperatures can be independently controlled, and various temperature profiles can be configured. This facility will mainly be used for high quality crystal growth experiments using unidirectional solidification.]

In the ESA COL (Columbus Orbital Laboratory), Cady Coleman unstowed & set up the PPFS (Portable Pulmonary Function System) hardware, including MBS (Mixing Bag System), for her 2nd session with the VO2max assessment, integrated with Thermolab, scheduled tomorrow. [The experiment VO2max uses the PPFS, CEVIS ergometer cycle, PFS (Pulmonary Function System) gas cylinders and mixing bag system, plus multiple other pieces of hardware to measure oxygen uptake, cardiac output, and more. The exercise protocol consists of a 2-min rest period, then three 5-min stages at workloads eliciting 25%, 50% & 75% of aerobic capacity as measured pre-flight, followed by a 25-watt increase in workload every minute until the crewmember reaches maximum exercise capacity. At that point, CEVIS workload increase is stopped, and a 5-min cool down period follows at the 25% load. Rebreathing measurements are initiated by the subject during the last minute of each stage. Constraints are: no food 2 hrs prior to exercise start, no caffeine 8 hrs prior to exercise, and must be well hydrated.]

FE-2 Skripochka started his 2nd session of the standard 24-hour ECG (electrocardiogram) recording under the Russian MedOps PZE MO-2 protocol. [After 24 hrs of ECG recording and blood pressure measurements with the Kardiomed (CDM) system, Oleg will doff the five-electrode Holter harness that read his dynamic (in motion) heart function from two leads and recorded on the “Kardioregistrator 90205” unit. The examination results will then be downloaded from the Holter ECG device to the RSE-Med laptop, controlled by the Kardiomed application. Later, the data will be downlinked as a compressed .zip-file via OCA.]

Later, Oleg used the standard ECOSFERA equipment, set up on 1/31, to conduct Part 3 of the microbial air sampling run for the MedOps SZM-MO-21 experiment, with the POTOK Air Purification System temporarily powered down, taking Kassetta no. 6 samples from cabin surfaces along with samples from crewmembers for sanitation and disease studies. The Petri dishes with the samples were then stowed in the KRIOGEM-03 thermostatic container and subsequently packed for return to Earth. [The equipment, consisting of an air sampler set, a charger and power supply unit, provides samples to help determine microbial contamination of the ISS atmosphere, specifically the total bacterial and fungal microflora counts and microflora composition according to morphologic criteria of microorganism colonies.]

FE-2 also completed another data collection session for the psychological MBI-16 Vzaimodejstvie (“Interactions”) program, accessing and completing the computerized study questionnaire on the RSE-Med laptop and saving the data in an encrypted file. It was Oleg’s 8th run. [The software has a “mood” questionnaire, a “group & work environment” questionnaire, and a “critical incidents” log. Results from the study, which is also mirrored by ground control subjects, could help to improve the ability of future crewmembers to interact safely and effectively with each other and with Mission Control, to have a more positive experience in space during multi-cultural, long-duration missions, and to successfully accomplish mission activities.]

Nespoli completed another periodic relocation of the TEPC (Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter) detector assembly, the primary radiation measurement tool in the ISS, moving it from SM Panel 327 to Node-3 loc. F3, utilizing UOP1 (Utility Outlet panel 1) on FD5 for power.

Afterwards, FE-5 did his 2nd onboard session with the MedOps experiment WinSCAT (Spaceflight Cognitive Assessment Tool for Windows), logging in on the MEC (Medical Equipment Computer) laptop and going through the psychological evaluation exercise on the PC-based WinSCAT application. [WinSCAT is a monthly time-constrained questionnaire test of cognitive abilities, routinely performed by astronauts aboard the ISS every 30 days before or after the PHS (periodic health status) test or on special CDR's, crewmembers or flight surgeons request. The test uses cognitive subtests that measure sustained concentration, verbal working memory, attention, short-term memory, spatial processing, and math skills. The five cognitive subtests are Coding Memory - Learning, Continuous Processing Task (CPT), Match to Sample, Mathematics, and Coding Delayed Recall. These WinSCAT subtests are the same as those used during NASA’s long-duration bed rest studies.]

Scott, Cady & Paolo had several hours between them set aside for unpacking HTV2 and transferring cargo that will not impact the ULF-5 stowage plan. At ~1:50pm, Scott Kelly reported on HTV2 transfer ops in a teleconference with ground specialists

Kaleri worked ~2 hrs in Soyuz TMA-01M/24S (#701, docked at MRM2), outfitting it with four M4294M Microamperemeter assemblies which he installed at instrument panel locations. Documentary photography was then taken and downlinked for a tagup with ground specialists.

FE-1 then prepared for ATV-2 (Automated Transfer Vehicle 2) arrival on 2/23 by getting the ATV PU hand controller from temporary stowage and installing it with its stand at the nominal location for rendezvous/docking ops.

Afterwards, Alex installed a P-16 filter cartridge of the SOGS air revitalization subsystem in the SM and activated it.

Next, Kaleri conducted the routine weekly inspection of the SRV-K2M BRPK-2 (Condensate Water Processor / Condensate Separation & Pumping Unit 2), hardware line 3, in the SM by opening and closing valves on ground request.

Sasha also worked on the BITS2-12 onboard telemetry measurement system, mating connectors to one (ZU1A) of its four ZU memory/recording devices (EA025M) to allow its use as ZU1B device. [BITS2-12 is the primary telemetry downlink path for both FGB and SM parameters. The system collects, records, and transmits measurement data concerning all RS (Russian Segment) systems, science hardware and health status parameters of crewmembers to the ground. It provides ground specialists with insight in RS systems operations.]

FE-4 Kondratyev & FE-2 Skripochka had another hour for unloading Progress 41P (#409) and transferring cargo to the ISS while updating the IMS (Inventory Management System) database.

Oleg also handled the daily IMS (Inventory Management System) maintenance, updating/editing its standard “delta file” including stowage locations, for the regular weekly automated export/import to its three databases on the ground (Houston, Moscow, Baikonur).

Dima conducted the routine daily servicing of the SOZh system (Environment Control & Life Support System, ECLSS) in the SM. [Regular daily SOZh maintenance consists, among else, of checking the ASU toilet facilities, replacement of the KTO & KBO solid waste containers, replacement of EDV-SV waste water and EDV-U urine containers and filling EDV-SV, KOV (for Elektron), EDV-ZV & EDV on RP flow regulator.]

In COL, Nespoli powered up the ERB2 (European Recording Binocular 2) from the EDR (European Drawer Rack) and checked it out before letting it run on its internal clock. [The internal clock runs for 1hr and 20min until ERB2 is shut down, having recorded on its 135-min capacity hard disk.]

Paolo completed the regular monthly session of the CHeCS (Crew Health Care Systems) emergency medical operations OBT (On-Board Training) drill, a 30-min. exercise to refresh his CMO (Crew Medical Officer) acuity in a number of critical health areas. The video-based proficiency drill today focused on Nosebleed. [The HMS (Health Maintenance Systems) hardware, including ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) equipment, may be used in contingency situations where crew life is at risk. To maintain proficiency, crewmembers spend one hour per month reviewing HMS and ACLS equipment and procedures via the HMS and ACLS CBT (computer-based training). The training drill, each crewmember for him/herself, refreshes their memory of the on-orbit stowage and deployment locations, equipment etc. and procedures.]

Cady conducted the regular (~weekly) inspection & maintenance, as required, of the CGBA-4 (Commercial Generic Bioprocessing Apparatus 4) and CGBA-5 payloads in their ERs (EXPRESS Racks).

At ~11:15am, CDR Kelly supported a PAO TV event, responding to three interviews – one with Associated Press, the second with the New York Times, the third with Fox News Channel’s “Happening Now”.

SSRMS Walkoff and MT Translation: At ~9:00am–1:30pm, ground controllers walked off the SSRMS (Space Station Remote Manipulator System) to the MBS MT (Mobile Base System Mobile Transporter), which then was to be moved along its rails from WS5 (Worksite 5) to WS7 to get the SPDM (Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator) with the ORUs (On-orbit Replaceable Units) at Lab PDGF (Power & data Grapple Fixture).

The crewmembers worked out with their regular 2-hr physical exercise on the TVIS treadmill (FE-1, FE-2, FE-4), ARED advanced resistive exerciser (CDR, FE-2, FE-4, FE-5, FE-6), T2/COLBERT advanced treadmill (CDR, FE-5, FE-6) and VELO ergometer bike with bungee cord load trainer (FE-1).

CEO (Crew Earth Observation) targets uploaded today were Aurora Borealis, NW North America (DYNAMIC EVENT: Today Statistical Auroral Oval indicated the potential for a broad band of moderate activity from northeastern Asia to northwestern North America. Beginning at the time indicated, the crew was to look obliquely left of track for the next 6 minutes to acquire imagery of this awesome atmospheric phenomenon. This target has been requested by the Charleston Middle School Core A group of the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program), Freetown, Sierra Leone (fair weather is expected for a midday near-nadir pass of Freetown, Sierra Leone. ISS approached the target from the NW. This capital city of just over 1 million is situated on south side of an estuary on the Sierra Leon River. This area has one of the world’s largest natural deep water harbors. As ISS tracked along the west coast Africa southeast of Cape Verde, the crew was to look for this area), Managua, Nicaragua (ISS had a midmorning nadir pass for this target, and the pass may be early enough to avoid the diurnal formation of clouds so typical of this part of the world. Approach was from the NW, and ground track neared the west coast of Central America. Looking for the smaller Lake Managua just northwest of the larger Lake Nicaragua. This capital city of nearly 2 million is located on the south shore of Lake Managua).

ISS Orbit (as of this morning, 8:34am EST [= epoch])
Mean altitude – 352.3 km
Apogee height – 354.7 km
Perigee height – 349.9 km
Period -- 91.58 min.
Inclination (to Equator) -- 51.64 deg
Eccentricity -- 0.0003567
Solar Beta Angle -- -8.1 deg (magnitude decreasing)
Orbits per 24-hr. day -- 15.72
Mean altitude loss in the last 24 hours – 65 m
Revolutions since FGB/Zarya launch (Nov. 98) – 69,971.

Significant Events Ahead (all dates Eastern Time and subject to change):
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
02/09/11 -- ISS reboost
02/15/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” launch (5:09pm)
02/16/11 -- Russian EVA-28
02/20/11 -- Progress M-07M/39P undock
02/23/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” docking (SM aft)
02/24/11 -- STS-133/Discovery launch ULF5 (ELC4, PMM)
02/24/11 -- HTV2 unberthing (Node-2 nadir)
03/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-01M/24S undock/landing (End of Increment 26)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
04/19/11 -- STS-134/Endeavour launch ULF6 (ELC-3, AMS)
04/27/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P launch
05/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S launch – M. Fossum (CDR-29)/S. Furukawa/S. Volkov
06/01/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
06/04/11 -- ATV-2 “Johannes Kepler” undock (SM aft)
06/21/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P launch
06/23/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P docking (SM aft)
06/28/11 -- STS-135/Atlantis ULF7 (MPLM)
08/29/11 -- Progress M-11M/43P undocking
08/30/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P launch
09/01/11 -- Progress M-12M/44P docking (SM aft)
09/16/11 – Soyuz TMA-21/26S undock/landing (End of Increment 28)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S launch – D.Burbank (CDR-30)/A.Shkaplerov/A.Ivanishin
10/02/11 – Soyuz TMA-23/28S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/25/11 -- Progress M-10M/42P undocking
10/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P launch
10/28/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P docking (DC-1)
11/16/11 -- Soyuz TMA-22/27S undock/landing (End of Increment 29)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/30/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S launch – O.Kononenko (CDR-31)/A.Kuipers/D.Pettit
12/02/11 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S docking (MRM1)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
12/??/11 -- 3R Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) w/ERA – on Proton.
12/26/11 -- Progress M-13M/45P undock
12/27/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P launch
12/29/11 -- Progress M-14M/46P docking (DC-1)
03/05/12 -- Progress M-12M/44P undock
03/16/12 -- Soyuz TMA-23/28S undock/landing (End of Increment 30)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/30/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S launch – G.Padalka (CDR-32)/J.Acaba/K.Valkov
04/01/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S docking (MRM2)
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
05/15/12 -- Soyuz TMA-24/29S undock/landing (End of Increment 31)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
05/29/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S launch – S.Williams (CDR-33)/Y.Malenchenko/A.Hoshide
05/31/12 – Soyuz TMA-26/31S docking
--------------Six-crew operations----------------
09/09/12 -- Soyuz TMA-25/30S undock/landing (End of Increment 32)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
09/23/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S launch – K.Ford (CDR-34)/O. Novitskiy/E.Tarelkin
09/25/12 – Soyuz TMA-27/32S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
10/07/12 -- Soyuz TMA-26/31S undock/landing (End of Increment 33)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
11/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-28/33S launch – C.Hadfield (CDR-35)/T.Mashburn/R.Romanenko
11/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-28/33S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 -- Soyuz TMA-27/32S undock/landing (End of Increment 34)
--------------Three-crew operations-------------
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S launch.
03/xx/12 – Soyuz TMA-29/34S docking
--------------Six-crew operations-------------