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Fung-Wong (was 16W - NW Pacific)
September 24, 2014

[image-128]NASA Sees the End of Post- Depression Fung-Wong

Tropical Depression Fung-Wong looked more like a cold front on infrared satellite imagery from NASA than it did a low pressure area with a circulation.

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Fung-Wong on Sept. 23 at 12:23 a.m. EDT. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard Aqua gathered infrared temperature data on the storm's clouds. The data was false-colored at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California and showed that the storm resembled a frontal system more than a depression.  The center of circulation was southwest of the bulk of thunderstorms and showers, which resembled a curved front. The strongest thunderstorms had cloud-top temperatures near -63F/-53C, and were over Japan's northern Ryuku Islands.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued the final bulletin on Fung-Wong on Sept. 23 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) when it was centered about 351 miles west of Sasebo, Japan, near 32.4 north latitude and 122.8 east longitude. At the time, the depression had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was moving to the northeast at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

On Sept. 24, the remnants of Fung-Wong, now an extra-tropical storm continued moving to the northeast and into the tropical cyclone history books.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-112]Sept. 23, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Depression Fung-Wong Becoming More Frontal

Tropical Depression Fung-Wong skirted the coast of mainland China and is moving through the East China Sea. NASA's Aqua satellite captured cloud top temperature data that showed strongest thunderstorms were stretched out as the storm continues to look more frontal in nature.

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Fung-Wong on Sept. 22 at 1:23 p.m. EDT, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument read cloud top temperatures. AIRS detected strongest, highest storms, those with the coldest cloud tops stretched out from northwest to southeast giving the depression an appearance more like a cold front than a depression.

On Sept. 23 at 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) Tropical Depression Fung-Wong had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots 34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was centered near 32.8 north latitude and 123.5 longitude, about 351 nautical miles west of Sasebo, Japan. It was moving to the northeast at 11 knots (12.6 mph/20.3 kph).

On Sept. 23, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that there is a defined center of circulation near the southern edge of the large area of frontal clouds. There was also very limited thunderstorm development pushed over the northeastern quadrant by wind shear. That wind shear is pretty strong, blowing at up to 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph).

Fung-Wong isn't long for the world as it is also interacting with a frontal system located over the West Sea and South Korea. The storm has already started converting to an extra-tropical storm (the core of the storm is going from warm to cold).

Fung-Wong is expected to turn east-northeast toward southern Korea and gain frontal characteristics.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-96]Sept. 22, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Storm Fung-Wong Move Through East China Sea

Tropical Storm Fung-Wong weakened over the weekend of Sept. 20-21 as it moved over Taiwan and approached Shanghai, China.

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong when it was approaching Taiwan on Sept. 20 at 1:35 a.m. EDT.

On Sunday, Sept. 21, Tropical Storm Fung-Wong was over Taiwan. It was centered at 26.0 north latitude and 122.0 east longitude, just 60 miles north-northeast of Taipei, Taiwan and moving to the north. Maximum sustained winds were near 50 knots (57 knots/92.6 kph).

 By Monday, Sept. 22, Fung-Wong's center was approaching the China coast, south of Shanghai, but is curving away from land and headed toward South Korea. At 10 a.m. EDT, Maximum sustained winds weakened to 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). Fung-Wong was centered near 29.6 east latitude and 122.4 east longitude, about 135 nautical miles south-southeast of Shanghai.

Infrared satellite imagery on Sept. 22 shows that the storm is being affected by westerly vertical wind shear as the bulk of showers and thunderstorms are being pushed northeast of the center. Vertical wind shear, when strong enough can weaken a storm's circulation and the overall storm and that's what is happening with Fung-Wong.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expects Fung-Wong to continue curving to the east-northeast and grazing southern South Korea. Over the next day or two, Fung-Wong is expected to become extra-tropical, that is, its core will go from warm to cold, like a regular mid-latitude low pressure system. As it transitions, JTWC expects vertical wind shear to increase in the next couple of days and continue to weaken it. By Sept. 24 or 25, that wind shear is expected to dissipate Fung-Wong.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-80]Sept. 19, 2014 - NASA Eyes Tropical Storm Fung-Wong Move Through Northwestern Pacific

Tropical Storm Fung-Wong continued to affect the Philippines while moving north through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.  NASA's Aqua satellite provided infrared data on the storm's clouds that showed some high, strong thunderstorms with the potential for heavy rainfall over the northern and central regions of the country.  The storm is now expected to affect three more countries over the next several days.

The AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite uses infrared light to read cloud top temperatures in tropical cyclones. When Aqua passed over Fung-Wong infrared data saw some very cold cloud top temperatures and strong storms.  Those storms had cloud top temperatures near -63F/-53C indicating they were high into the troposphere and had the potential to generate heavy rain.

On Sept. 19 at 0900 UTC (5 a.m. EDT) Fung-Wong had maximum sustained winds near 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph). It was centered near 18.9 north latitude and 121.0 east longitude, about 247 nautical miles north of Manila, Philippines. Fung-Wong was moving to the west-northwest at 13 knots (15 mph/24 kph).

Now that Fung-Wong is departing the Philippines, it is now forecast to affect Taiwan, China and Japan. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center now forecasts the center of Fung-Wong to track through Taiwan from south to north over Sept. 20 and 21 and make another landfall near Shanghai, China on Sept. 23 before curving back over the ocean and head toward southern Japan.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]NASA Sees Western Edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong Affecting Philippines

The NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite saw the western edge of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong over the central Philippines on Sept. 18.  Fung-Wong developed on Sept. 17 as Tropical Depression 16W, and strengthened into a tropical storm by 5 p.m. EDT on Sept. 17.

When NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Fung-Wong on Sept. 18 at 05:24 UTC and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard captured a visible picture of the storm. The VIIRS instrument revealed that a thick band of powerful thunderstorms spiraled around the southwestern quadrant of the storm and over the central Philippines.

On Sept. 18 at 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT), Tropical Storm Fung-Wong's maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots (40 mph/64 kph). It was centered near 16.0 north and 125.2 east about 284 nautical miles (326.8 miles/ 526 km) east-northeast of Manila, Philippines. Fung-Wong is moving to the west-northwest at 13 knots (14.9 mph/24.0 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) noted that although there is a chance for intensification, because Fung-Wong is so close to the Philippines, the land will limit how much strengthening can occur.

Fung-Wong is expected to move over the northern tip of Luzon where it will curve north and parallel Taiwan, while its center remains at sea. The JTWC then forecasts Fung-Wong to make landfall in Kyushu, Japan by September 23.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Sept. 17, 2014 - NASA Sees Tropical Depression 16W Form in NW Pacific

[image-51]NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 16W on Sept. 16 at 12:29 p.m. EDT and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument captured infrared data on the storm.

Infrared imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard Aqua shows bands of thunderstorms in the northern and southern quadrant wrapping into the low-level center of circulation. The low-level center also appears to be consolidating, indicating that the storm is intensifying.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Sept. 17, Tropical Depression 16W had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was centered near 13.1 north latitude and 130.3 east longitude, about 581 nautical miles (668 miles/1,076 km) east of Manila, Philippines. The depression was moving to the west-northwest at 19 knots (21.8 mph/35.1 kph). It is expected to reach typhoon strength on September 19 while tracking through the Philippine Sea and remaining east of Luzon, Philippines.

Tropical Depression 16W is expected to move to the northwest and stay east of the Philippines, then curve to the northeast and pass east of Taiwan and head to Japan.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland

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Tropical Storm Fung-Wong
This visible image of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong was taken on Sept. 18 at 05:24 UTC from the VIIRS instrument aboard NOAA-NASA's Suomi NPP satellite.
Image Credit: 
NRL/NOAA/NASA
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Aqua satellite view of Tropical Depression 16W on 16 Sept 2014
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression 16W on Sept. 16 at 12:29 p.m. EDT and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument captured infrared data on the storm.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Fung-Wong
This infrared image of newborn Tropical Storm Fung-Wong was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on Sept. 18 at 1:53 p.m. EDT and shows cold, strong thunderstorms around the center (purple) over the central Philippines.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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MODIS Image of Fung-Wong
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong approaching Taiwan on Sept. 20 at 1:35 a.m. EDT.
Image Credit: 
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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AIRS Image of Fung-Wong
NASA's Aqua satellite gathered infrared data on Fung-Wong on Sept. 22 at 1:23 p.m. EDT, reading cloud top temperatures. Strongest storms, coldest cloud tops appear in purple.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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AIRS image of Fung-Wong
NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Depression Fung-Wong on Sept. 23 at 12:23 a.m. EDT and the storm resembled a frontal system more than a depression.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
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Page Last Updated: September 24th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner