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Hanna (was TD9 - Atlantic Ocean)
October 28, 2014

[image-113]Remnants of Tropical Depression Soaking Central America

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 27 when it made landfall near the northern Nicaragua and southern Honduras border.

On Oct. 27 at 16:00 UTC (12 p.m. EDT) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Hanna straddling the border between Honduras and Nicaragua. The image, created by NASA's MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, showed strong thunderstorms on both sides of the border, bringing heavy rainfall to those area.

At 10 a.m. EDT on Oct. 28, Roatan Airport in Guanaja, Honduras reported heavy rainfall with thunderstorms. At the same time, Islas Del Cisne, Honduras reported thunderstorms.

On Oct. 28, the National Hurricane Center noted that Hanna's remnants continued to generate heavy rainfall and isolated thunderstorms over Honduras and northern Nicaragua as well as the Yucatan basin south of 20 north latitude and west of 80 west longitude.

The government of Honduras has discontinued the tropical storm warning for the coast of Honduras. There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect. The National Hurricane Center expects the remnants to dissipate by Oct. 28 at 8 p.m. EDT.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-95]Oct. 27, 2014 - NASA Sees a "Zombie" Tropical Storm Kick Off Halloween Week

NASA's Terra satellite spotted a "zombie" tropical storm as Halloween week kicks off.  Tropical Depression 9 made landfall in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula late last week and lingered as a remnant low pressure area on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 25 and 26. Satellite data revealed that those remnants had reformed quickly and jumped up to tropical storm status, where it became "zombie" storm named Tropical Storm Hanna off the coast of Nicaragua. NASA's Terra satellite spotted strong thunderstorms around the zombie storm's center as it passed overhead.

At 9:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 27, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) issued a tropical storm warning for Punta Patuca, Honduras southward to Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area...in this case within the next 6 to 12 hours. The National Hurricane Center noted that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area through this evening. In addition, Hanna could produce 10 to 12 inches (250 to 300 mm) of rain, with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches (400 mm), across Honduras and northern Nicaragua. These rainfall Amounts will produce life-threatening flash floods and mudslides.

NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 27 at 03:45 UTC (Oct. 26 at 11:45 p.m. EDT) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument gathered infrared data on the storm. The MODIS instrument showed high thunderstorms around the newly reformed center of circulation with cold cloud top temperatures near -63F/-53C that indicated they were high in the troposphere. Those strong thunderstorms have the potential to drop heavy rainfall.

Forecaster Berg at NHC noted that Hanna's center is very close to the coast of northeastern Nicaragua and moving to the west-southwest. Hanna is expected to make landfall and move inland over Nicaragua by late today, Oct. 27. 

At 10 a.m. EDT, Hanna's center was near 14.5 north latitude and 83.2 west longitude. That's about 35 miles (60 km) north-northeast of Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, and about 35 miles (55 km) south of Cabo Gracias a Dios on the Nicaragua/Honduras border.  Hanna was moving toward the west-southwest near 7 mph (11 kph) and is expected to continue in that direction for the next day or two. Maximum sustained winds were near 40 mph (65 kph) and little change in strength is expected before landfall, followed by weakening as it moves inland.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-69]Oct. 24, 2014 - Satellite Catches Lingering Remnants of Tropical Depression 9

NOAA's GOES-East satellite has been keeping an eye on the remnants of Tropical Depression 9.

On Oct. 24 at 14:30 UTC (10:30 a.m. EDT) GOES-East captured a visible image of clouds and thunderstorms associated with former Tropical Depression 9,, centered over the southeastern Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, Belize, and the adjacent northwestern Caribbean Sea.  

NOAA's National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that surface pressures were rising in the area, and the re-development of the former depression is unlikely. The remnants are expected to continue moving east over the next day or two. NHC gives the remnants a low chance, just 10 percent, of re-forming into a depression over the next couple of days.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-77]Oct. 23, 2014 - Remnants of Post-Tropical Depression Nine in Northwestern Caribbean Sea

Tropical Depression 9 made landfall late on Oct. 22 and half a day later NOAA's GOES-East satellite spotted its remnants stretching from Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula into the northwestern Caribbean Sea.

Post Tropical Depression 9 began moving inland in Mexico between Campeche and Ciudad del Carmen just after 0000 UTC on Oct. 23 (8 p.m. EDT on Oct. 22).

By 11 p.m. EDT on Oct. 22 (0300 UTC on Oct 23), the center of post-tropical cyclone nine had moved inland over the Yucatan Peninsula. Its center was located near latitude 18.9 north and longitude 90.9 west.  That's about 75 miles (120 km) south-southwest of Campeche, Mexico. The post-tropical cyclone was moving toward the east-southeast near 6 mph (9 kph). Maximum sustained winds were near 30 mph (45 kph). The depression was declared to be a remnant low after landfall.

On Oct. 23 at 8:05 a.m. EDT the National Hurricane Center Atlantic Tropical Weather Discussion noted that the 1004 millibar low pressure center is in Mexico near 19 north latitude and 90.5 west longitude. Numerous strong thunderstorms from the remnants were occurring from 19 north latitude to 21 north latitude between 85 and 87 west longitude, which is off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Northwestern Caribbean Sea.

At 16:30 UTC (12:30 p.m. EDT) NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of the depression's remnants that showed the bulk of clouds and showers associated with it over the northwestern Caribbean Sea. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The short-lived depression's remnants continued to generate thunderstorms over the northwestern Caribbean Sea on Oct. 23.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-50]Oct. 22, 2014 - Tropical Depression 9 Forms in Gulf of Mexico

Tropical Depression Nine formed over the western Bay of Campeche, Gulf of Mexico and is forecast to make a quick landfall on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. NOAA's GOES-East Satellite captured the birth of the depression.

NOAA's GOES-East Satellite captured an image of the birth of Tropical Depression 9 on Oct. 22 at 1600 UTC (12 p.m. EDT) in the western Bay of Campeche. The clouds associated with the depression stretched over the Yucatan Peninsula and into the western Caribbean Sea.

On Oct. 22, a Tropical Storm Warning was in effect from Celestun to Frontera, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center noted that the center of tropical depression nine (TD9) was located near latitude 19.4 north and longitude 92.4 west. The depression is stationary, but a slow eastward motion should begin later today. On the forecast track...the center of the Tropical cyclone will be near the coast of the Mexican State of Campeche tonight or early Thursday. Maximum sustained winds remain near 35 mph (55 kph) and the depression could become a tropical storm before it moves inland.

The depression is expected to produce total rainfall accumulations of 5 to 10 inches across the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico with a maximum of 15 inches possible. These rainfall amounts may produce life-threatening flash floods. Tropical storm conditions are expected to begin in portions of the warning area by late this afternoon or evening.

Tropical Depression 9 is expected in intensify to tropical storm strength before making landfall in the Yucatan Peninsula.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

NOAA's GOES-East Satellite captured the birth of Tropical Depression 9 on Oct. 22 at 1600 UTC (12 p.m. EDT) in the western Bay of Campeche.
NOAA's GOES-East Satellite captured the birth of Tropical Depression 9 on Oct. 22 at 1600 UTC (12 p.m. EDT) in the western Bay of Campeche.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
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GOES-East image of TD9
At 16:30 UTC (12:30 p.m. EDT) NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of the depression's remnants that showed the bulk of clouds and showers associated with it over the northwestern Caribbean Sea.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
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MODIS image of Hanna
NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Storm Hanna on Oct. 26 at 11:45 p.m. EDT and saw high thunderstorms (red) around the newly reformed center of circulation with cold cloud top temperatures near -63F/-53C that indicated they were high in the troposphere. Credit:
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
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Terra image of Hanna
On Oct. 27 at 16:00 UTC (12 p.m. EDT) NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of Tropical Storm Hanna (09L) over Honduras and Nicaragua border.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
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GOES-East image of TD9
On Oct. 24 at 14:30 UTC (10:30 a.m. EDT) GOES-East captured a visible image of clouds and thunderstorms centered over the southeastern Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico, Belize, and the adjacent northwestern Caribbean Sea.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
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Page Last Updated: October 28th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner