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TD16E (Eastern Pacific)
September 15, 2014

[image-51]Satellite Sees Tropical Depression 16-E Remnants Scooped by Hurricane Odile

At 11 p.m. EDT on Sunday, September 14, Tropical Depression 16-E was officially a remnant low pressure area. NOAA's GOES-West satellite showed the clouds associated with the remnants being drawn into the massive circulation of nearby Hurricane Odile.  

At 5 a.m. on Sunday, September 14, Tropical Depression 16-E (TD 16-E) was still holding together despite being close to the circulation of Hurricane Odile. At that time, the center of tropical depression 16-E was located near latitude 14.9 north and longitude 115.3 west. That's about 655 miles (1,055 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California.  The depression was moving toward the east near 12 mph (19 kph). Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph).

By 11 p.m. that night, the remnant low pressure area was located near 16.3 north latitude and 112.3 west longitude, about 480 miles (775 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Its maximum sustained winds were still near 35 mph (55 kph), but were waning. It was moving to the east-northeast at 13 mph (20 kph).

The National Hurricane Center noted that "satellite imagery suggests that the tropical depression no longer has a well-defined closed surface circulation."

By 9:45 a.m. EDT on September 15, the remnants of TD16-E were being absorbed into Hurricane Odile, which was located near the western coast of Mexico. NOAA's GOES-West satellite saw the clouds associated with the remnants wrapping into southwestern side of Odile. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.  In the image, the remnants appeared as a small shapeless area of clouds being drawn into the larger counter-clockwise circulation of the hurricane.    

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-63]Sept. 12, 2014 - Tropical Storm Odile Expected to "Eat" Tropical Depression 16E

An infrared picture of Tropical Depression 16E from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows the tiny storm dwarfed by nearby Tropical Storm Odile. Odile is expected to draw the depression into its circulation and "eat" it in the next few days.

The image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean and the two storms was taken at 8 a.m. EDT (5 a.m. PDT) on September 12. It shows that Tropical Depression 16E (TD16E) is about 10 times smaller in comparison to Tropical Storm Odile, located to its east. NOAA manages the GOES-West satellite but the image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The National Hurricane Center noted that TD16E is unable to intensify because of its close proximity to Tropical Storm Odile.

Forecaster Pasch at NOAA's National Hurricane Center noted that center of TD16E is very difficult to find on geostationary images (like GOES-West). Pasch noted that an image from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager aboard a Defense Meteorological Satellite Program satellite taken at 1056 UTC (6:56 a.m. EDT) indicated that TD16E's center continued to be located near the northeastern edge of the main area of thunderstorms. However, first-light visible pictures suggested that the low-level circulation is poorly defined.

At 11 a.m. EDT (8 a.m. PDT) TD16E's maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph) and little change in strength is expected over the next two days. The center of the depression was located near latitude 16.6 north and longitude 120.0 west. That's about 785 miles (1,265 km) west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.  The depression is drifting toward the north near 2 mph (4 kph) and is expected to turn east then east-southeast as it gets caught up in Odile's circulation.

Pasch noted that the unfavorable influence of the much larger circulation of Tropical Storm Odile, centered about 800 nautical miles east, will hamper the depression's ability to strengthen. In fact, the depression is expected to dissipate in the next day or two, while being absorbed by Odile.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


[image-36]Sept. 11, 2014 - NASA's Aqua Satellite's Baby Announcement for Tropical Depression 16E

In an infrared "new baby announcement" NASA's Aqua satellite provided a picture of the newborn tropical depression 16E in the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured infrared data just before Tropical Depression 16E was named by the National Hurricane Center on September 11. The AIRS data showed cold cloud tops of strong thunderstorms circled around the center of the storm's circulation. Those storms had cloud top temperatures near -63F/-53C indicating they were high into the troposphere and had the potential to generate heavy rain.

At 8:30 a.m. PDT (11:30 a.m. EDT) the center of tropical depression Sixteen-E was located near latitude 16.1 north and longitude 119.4 west. That's about 775 miles (1,250 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.

Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph (55 kph) and the National Hurricane Center noted that slight strengthening is possible during the next 24 hours and the depression is expected to become a tropical storm. Weakening is forecast after that time. The depression is moving toward the north-northwest near 12 mph (19 kph) and is expected to turn toward the north and northeast followed by a turn to the east or east-southeast.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

AIRS image of TD16E
This infrared image of newborn Tropical Depression 16E was taken by the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite and shows cold, strong thunderstorms around the center (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL/Ed Olsen
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GOES Image of 16E and Odile
This NOAA GOES-West image taken Sept. 12 at 8 a.m. EDT shows Tropical Depression 16E (left) is about 10 times smaller in comparison to Tropical Storm Odile (right).
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
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Remnants of 16E
At 9:45 a.m. EDT on September 15, the remnants of TD16-E were being absorbed into Hurricane Odile near the western coast of Mexico. The clouds associated with the remnants were seen wrapping into Odile on imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NOAA GOES Project
Image Token: 
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Page Last Updated: September 15th, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner