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Mangkhut (Northwest Pacific Ocean)
August 8, 2013

NASA Sees Former Tropical Storm Mangkhut's Remnants Raining Out[image-94]

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of former Tropical Storm Mangkhut's remnants on Aug. 8 raining on northern Vietnam and adjacent areas as it continued to move inland after making landfall in northern Vietnam on Aug. 7.

Mangkhut made landfall 80 nautical miles south of Hanoi, Vietnam on Aug. 7. At the time of the last advisory on the system, it was centered near 20.1 north and 104.7 east, about 77 nautical miles south-southwest of Hanoi. Since then, it has moved into northern Vietnam, Laos and southern China.

The infrared data, captured on Aug. 8 at 2:17 a.m. EDT by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard the Aqua satellite, showed the circulation of ex-Tropical Storm Mangkhut's clouds and showers over northern Viet Nam, Laos and China. At 10 a.m. EDT on Aug. 8, Dienbien, Vietnam (the capital of Diện Biên Province located in western north Vietnam) was reporting light rain from Mangkhut's remnants. Farther north, the airport at Kunming, China was reporting cloudy skies and the forecast calls for scattered showers and thunderstorms overnight from the remnants as it dissipates.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 07, 2013 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Mangkhut Making Vietnam Landfall[image-78]

Tropical Storm Mangkhut had some strong thunderstorms around its center as it began making landfall in northern Vietnam on Aug. 7. Infrared data from NASA's Aqua satellite showed very cold cloud top temperatures of those strong thunderstorms as it passed overhead.

On Aug. 6 at 20:55 UTC (4:55 p.m. EDT) NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Mangkhut as it tracked west-northwest through the Gulf of Tonkin on its way to a landfall. Aqua's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument captured infrared data that showed that cloud top temperatures of some thunderstorms around Mangkhut's center were as cold as 210 kelvin/-81F/-63C indicating powerful storms with the potential for heavy rainfall.

The AIRS data also measures temperatures over land, and in the same image where it captured Tropical Storm Mangkhut, the data showed some of the surface temperatures in eastern central China appeared warmer than 300 kelvin/80F/26.8C at 1841 UTC on Aug. 6 or 2:41 a.m. China local time. Those are warm overnight temperatures!

Early on Aug. 7, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that "Animated infrared satellite imagery shows the deep convective bands associated with the system have collapsed as they began to interact with the topography of Vietnam." A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for Aug. 7, according to the Vietnam National Centre for Hydro-Meteorological Forecasting.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 7, Mangkhut's center was very close to landfall. Maximum sustained winds were near 35 knots, making it a minimal tropical storm. Mangkhut was about 92 nautical miles/106 miles/170 km south of Hanoi, Vietnam, near 19.8 north latitude and 105.8 east longitude. It was moving to the west-northwest at 13 knots/15 mph/24 kph.

After Mangkhut makes landfall about 65 miles south of Hanoi, the storm is expected to dissipate within 24 hours.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


August 06, 2013 - NASA Sees a Second Tropical Storm Headed to Northern Vietnam in a Week[image-51]

Tropical Depression 10W has strengthened in 24 hours and become Tropical Storm Mangkhut. Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the strong thunderstorms around Mangkhut's center that hinted at that intensification.

Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC expect Mangkhut to make landfall in northern Vietnam sometime on Aug. 8, just days after Tropical Storm Jebi made landfall and took lives. JTWC takes Mangkhut from the southeast, through the Gulf of Tonkin and making landfall just south of Hanoi. Tropical Storm Jebi came from the east, over Hainan Island, China and made landfall north of Hanoi.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) on Aug. 6, Tropical Storm Mangkhut had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots/40.2 mph/64.8 kph. The center of Mangkhut was located near 16.4 north and 109.7 east, about 104 nautical miles/ 119.7 miles/192.6 km east of Da Nang, Vietnam. Mangkhut is moving to the northwest at 17 knots/19.5 mph/31.4 kph.

Infrared satellite imagery from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite taken on Aug. 5 at 17:59 UTC (12:59 p.m. EDT) showed strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops around the center of what was Tropical Depression 10W. The depression since strengthened into a tropical storm. AIRS also revealed fragmented bands of thunderstorms wrapping into the low-level center of the storm.

The JTWC is forecasting Tropical Storm Mangkhut to drift across the Gulf of Tonkin, and make landfall just southeast of Hanoi.

Text credit:  Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Image Token: 
[image-36]
Tropical Storm Mangkhut
This infrared image from the AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite was taken on Aug. 6 at 10:39 UTC (6:39 a.m. EDT). Strong thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops were around the center and in fragmented bands around the center (purple).
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-51]
AIRS image of Mangkhut
This Aug. 6 infrared image from AIRS on NASA’s Aqua satellite showed that cloud top temperatures in Mangkhut are as cold as 210 kelvin/-81F/-63Ct (purple) indicating powerful storms.
Image Credit: 
NASA/JPL
Image Token: 
[image-78]
NASA's Aqua satellite captured this infrared image of Mangkhut's remnants on Aug. 8 at 2:17 a.m. EDT. Ex-Tropical Storm Mangkhut's clouds and showers (blue) are over Northern Viet Nam, Laos and China.
Image Credit: 
NASA JPL, Ed Olsen
Image Token: 
[image-94]
Page Last Updated: August 8th, 2013
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner