LOADING...
Text Size
Sinlaku (Northwest Pacific)
December 1, 2014

[image-96][image-114][image-77]NASA Satellites Provide Triple Coverage on Tropical Storm Sinlaku

Tropical Storm Sinlaku made landfall in east-central Vietnam bringing some moderate to heavy rainfall with it.  NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's TRMM and GPM satellites analyzed the rainfall rates occurring in Sinlaku before it made landfall while NASA's Terra satellite spotted the storm as it came ashore in Vietnam.

Tropical Storm Sinlaku formed on November 26, 2014 over the southeastern Philippines. As a tropical depression Sinlaku caused flooding in areas of the Visayas and Mindanao. The storm then moved west and crossed the South China Sea where it headed to Vietnam for a final landfall.

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM core satellites viewed Sinlaku after it had strengthened into a tropical storm over the South China Sea.

Both TRMM and GPM provided information about the rate in which rain was falling within the storm. Rainfall derived from TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) data was collected when the satellite flew over on November 28, 2014 at 0716 UTC (2:16 a.m. EST).  The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) measurements occurred a little over six hours later at 1326 UTC (8:26 a.m. EST). The GMI found rain falling at a rate of over 82 mm/3.2 inches per hour in powerful thunderstorms north of Sinlaku's center of circulation.
At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a 3-D view of Sinlaku's precipitation structure was made using data from the Ku band on GPM's dual frequency radar instrument (DPR). DPR showed that some thunderstorms were reaching heights of 16.41 km (about 10.2 miles). The energy released by these towering storms often signals intensification in tropical cyclones. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)
predicted that Sinlaku would intensify and reach close to typhoon force winds of 60 knots (69 mph) before hitting Vietnam on November 30, 2014.

On Nov. 29 at 03:30 UTC (Nov. 28 at 10:30 p.m. EST), the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took a visible image of Tropical Storm Sinlaku as it began making landfall in Vietnam. At that time the western quadrant of the storm was over the coast near Phu Yen.

Sinlaku made landfall in the Phu Yen Province and affected a large area from the Quang Ngai to Khanh Hoa Provinces. The storm moved inland and weakened into a depression on Nov. 30.

Hal Pierce / Rob Gutro
SSAI/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center


Nov. 28, 2014 - NASA Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Sinlaku in the South China Sea

[image-69]Tropical Depression 21W crossed the Philippines and moved into the South China Sea where warm waters helped strengthen the storm into Tropical Storm Sinlaku. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured an image that showed it appeared elongated.

Despite the strengthening of Tropical Depression 21W into a tropical storm on Nov. 28, it appeared elongated from southwest to northeast on visible imagery taken by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument that flies aboard Aqua. The MODIS image also showed that the strongest thunderstorms appeared northeast of center.

On Friday, Nov. 28 at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST) Sinlaku's maximum sustained winds had increased to 45 knots. Forecasters at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) expect the storm's winds to peak near 60 knots (69.0 mph/111.1 kph) on Nov. 29 before weakening. Sinlaku was centered near 12.0 north longitude and 106.4 east latitude, about 457 nautical miles (526 miles/846.4 km) east of Ho Chi Minh City, located in extreme southern Vietnam. The storm was moving to the west-northwest at 15 knots (17.2 mph/27.7 kph) and is expected to continue in that general direction.

The Vietnam Meteorological Agency issued a Tropical Storm Warning for several areas of the country. For updated warnings, visit: http://www.nchmf.gov.vn/web/en-US/43/Default.aspx.

The current forecast track takes Sinlaku's landfall just north of Quang Ngai on Nov. 29. Quang Ngai is located in east-central Vietnam. The storm is expected to dissipate rapidly after making landfall.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

 


 

[image-50]

Tropical Depression 21W Forms, Philippines Under Warnings

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite provided rainfall data as Tropical Depression 21W was making landfall in the southern Philippines on Nov. 26.

TRMM revealed areas of heavy rainfall in fragmented bands east of the center of circulation, where rain was falling at more than 1 inch (25 mm) per hour. TRMM rainfall data was overlaid on infrared data from the Japan Meteorological Agency's MTSAT-1 satellite that showed Tropical Depression 21W's (TD21W) clouds extended from western Mindanao, east into the Philippine Sea.

On Nov. 26, there were a number of warnings in effect for the Philippines. Public storm warning signal #1 was in effect for the province of Luzon that includes: Palawan and the Calamian Group of Islands. In Visayas: Southern Leyte, Bohol, Southern Cebu Including Cebu City, Negros Oriental, Southern Negros Occidental and Siquijor. In the province of Mindanao:

Surigao del Norte including Siargao Island, Surigao del Sur, Agusan del Norte & Sur, Dinagat Province, Camiguin, Misamis Oriental & Occidental, Bukidnon and Zamboanga del Norte.

At 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), TD21W was centered near 8.7 north longitude and 125.4 east latitude. That's about 468 nautical miles (538.6 miles/866.7 kph) southeast of Manila, Philippines. Maximum sustained winds were near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). TD21W is moving to the west at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph).

TD 21W is forecast to continue tracking westward along the southern edge of a sub-tropical ridge of high pressure which is located to the north of the depression and oriented east-west. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts TD21W to move over northern Mindanao late on Nov. 26 and weaken. By Nov. 27, TD21W is expected to emerge into the Sulu Sea where it is expected to strengthen.

Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Tropical Depression 21W
On Nov. 26, the TRMM satellite revealed areas of heavy rainfall in fragmented bands east of the center of circulation, where rain was falling at more than 1 inch (25 mm) per hour (red). Japan's MTSAT-1 satellite provided cloud data.
Image Credit: 
NASA/NRL
Image Token: 
[image-50]
MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took this visible image of Tropical Storm Sinlaku
On Nov. 29 at 03:30 UTC, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite took this visible image of Tropical Storm Sinlaku making landfall in Vietnam.
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response
Image Token: 
[image-77]
MODIS captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Sinlaku in the South China Sea.
The MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Storm Sinlaku in the South China Sea on Nov. 28 at 5:50 UTC (12:50 a.m. EST).
Image Credit: 
NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team
Image Token: 
[image-69]
The TRMM satellite flew over Sinlaku on November 28, 2014 at 0716 UTC and measured moderate rainfall.
The TRMM satellite flew over Sinlaku on November 28, 2014 at 0716 UTC and measured moderate rainfall.
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-96]
GPM satellite saw rain falling at a rate of over 82 mm/3.2 inches per hour north of Sinlaku's center
On Nov. 28, the GPM satellite saw rain falling at a rate of over 82 mm/3.2 inches per hour north of Sinlaku's center of circulation where thunderstorms were as high as 16.41 km (10.2 miles).
Image Credit: 
SSAI/NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce
Image Token: 
[image-114]
Image Token: 
[image-82]
Page Last Updated: December 1st, 2014
Page Editor: Lynn Jenner