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NASA's Curtis Manning Uses Cutting-Edge Technology to Explore Creating Tools and Parts in Space
08.25.06
 
Betty Humphery
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
(Phone: 256.544.0034)

Photo release: 06-099


Curtis Manning + Large (3872 x 2592, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 482, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Curtis Manning, ceramics engineer in the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., gets a closer look at a full-sized test part built in his lab. The plastic cube he is holding will help engineers at the Marshall Center re-design the environmental control and life support system on board the International Space Station to make it more efficient. (NASA/MSFC/D. Stoffer)


Curtis Manning, ceramics engineer in the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory, holds a plastic 5-inch model of the J2-X engine built by one of the machines in the lab. + Large (2592 x 3872, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 1076, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Curtis Manning, ceramics engineer in the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., holds a plastic 5-inch model of the J2-X engine built by one of the machines in the lab. The model shows the detail and intricate design the machines in the Rapid Prototyping lab are capable of building. The J2-X engine will be used in the Ares I and V vehicles which will eventually carry astronaut to the moon and on to Mars. (NASA/MSFC/D. Stoffer)


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