Search Marshall

Go

Photo Gallery

Text Size

NASA Astrobiologist Identifies New 'Extreme' Life Form
02.23.05
 
Steve Roy
Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala.
(Phone: 256.544.0034)
Photo release: 05-020


Dr. Richard Hoover and Dr. Elena Pikuta + Large (1140 x 900, 300 ppi)
+ Medium (720 x 510, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Dr. Richard Hoover, a NASA astrobiologist, and Dr. Elena Pikuta, a scientist at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, lead a team of researchers who recently discovered a new life form -- an "extremophile" that lives and thrives in conditions inhospitable to most life on Earth. The new discovery, named "Carnobacterium pleistocenium," was found in the U.S. Army's Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory near Fox, Alaska, in ice dating back some 32,000 years. The team’s findings were published in January 2005. NASA studies extremophiles to gain insight into the possibilities for life across the cosmos. (Photo: NASA/MSFC)




Hoover takes ice samples from the permafrost deep inside the U.S. Army’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory near Fox, Alaska. + Large (913 x 588, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

NASA astrobiologist Dr. Richard Hoover takes ice samples from the permafrost deep inside the U.S. Army's Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory near Fox, Alaska. The samples, dating back some 32,000 years, contained living organisms -- a previously unrecorded "extremophile" bacterial species identified by Hoover and his colleagues. Their findings were published in January 2005. NASA studies extremophiles -- organisms that live and thrive in conditions inhospitable to most life on Earth -- to gain insight into the possibilities for life across the cosmos. (Photo: NASA/Richard Hoover)



Seen under a microscope, a new bacterium identified by Hoover and his colleagues thrives. + Large (600 x 490, 72 ppi)
+ Small (100 x 75, 72 ppi)

Seen under a microscope, a new bacterium identified by NASA astrobiologist Dr. Richard Hoover and his colleagues thrives -- despite having been thawed from ice dating back some 32,000 years, to the Pleistocene era. Living bacteria are stained green. Hoover found the specimens in permafrost deep in the U.S. Army's Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory near Fox, Alaska. The bacterium -- identified over a period of years and published in January 2005 -- is a never-before-seen "extremophile," an organism that lives and thrives in conditions inhospitable to most life on Earth. NASA studies extremophiles to gain insight into the possibilities for life across the cosmos. (Photo courtesy of Asim Bej, University of Alabama at Birmingham)



For more information:

+ News Release