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Mars Surface Wind Tunnel
03.03.05
 
Vaccum chamber Interior of vacuum chamber from above showing Mars Surface Wind Tunnel and Vortex Generator with Eric Eddlemon and Jaimie Chhu.
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vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice with Jaimie Chhu.
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Vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice with Jaimie Chhu.
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Vortex Generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice with Jaimie Chhu.
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Vortex Generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice with Jaimie Chhu.
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Vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice.
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Vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice.
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Vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice.
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Vortex generator Vortex generator inside vacuum chamber using dry ice.
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mars wind tunnel test Mars Surface Wind Tunnel test section with Eric Eddlemon.
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mars wind tunnel test Mars Surface Wind Tunnel test section with Eric Eddlemon.
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mars surface wind tunnel Looking through Mars Surface Wind Tunnel air intake towards test section with Eric Eddlemon.
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Mars Surface Wind Tunnel Looking through Mars Surface Wind Tunnel air intake towards test section with Eric Eddlemon.
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Walnut shells Walnut shell particles used in vortex generator to simulate quartz dust on Mars.
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Walnut shells Walnut shell particles used in vortex generator to simulate quartz dust on Mars.
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Walnut shells Walnut shell particles used in vortex generator to simulate quartz dust on Mars.
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Silica Sand Silica Sand (Oklahoma 90) particles used in vortex generator and Mars Surface Wind Tunnel.
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Carbondale Red Clay Carbondale Red Clay dust used in vortex generator and Mars Surface Wind Tunnel.
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red clay Carbondale Red Clay dust used in vortex generator and Mars Surface Wind Tunnel.
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Sand and clay Silica Sand and Carbondale Red Clay
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sand and clay Silica Sand and Carbondale Red Clay
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sand and clay Silica Sand and Carbondale Red Clay
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sand and clay Silica Sand and Carbondale Red Clay
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sand and clay Silica Sand and Carbondale Red Clay
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control room Control room of Mars Surface Wind Tunnel with Eric Eddlemon.
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ASU dust devil Image from Arizona State University. Image credit Arizona State University. Image is cleared for news and public affairs use, but for any other use, please contact:

Planetary Geology Group
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Arizona State University
Box 871404
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404, USA
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simulated dust devil Image from Arizona State University. Image credit Arizona State University. Image is cleared for news and public affairs use, but for any other use, please contact:

Planetary Geology Group
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Arizona State University
Box 871404
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404, USA

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dust devil Image from Arizona State University. Image credit Arizona State University. Image is cleared for news and public affairs use, but for any other use, please contact:

Planetary Geology Group
Dept. of Geological Sciences
Arizona State University
Box 871404
Tempe, AZ 85287-1404, USA

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martian weather Dust Storms of 2001
The wide angle cameras of the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) system onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) are used every day to gather a global view of changes occurring in martian weather and surface frost patterns. Late in June 2001, as southern winter transitioned to spring, dust storm activity began to pick up as cold air from the south polar cap moved northward toward the warmer air at the martian equator. By early July, dust storms had popped up all over the planet, particularly throughout the southern hemisphere and in the Elysium/Amazonis regions of the northern hemisphere. Soon, the entire planet--except the south polar cap--was enshrouded in dust. Image courtesy: NASA
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martian dust devil From the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC):
At The center right of this image (above left) is a dust devil that, on May 21, 2002, was seen climbing the wall of a crater at 4.1°S, 9.5°W. This crater (above right) is in western Terra Meridiani. The dust devil was moving toward the northeast (upper right), leaving behind a dark trail where a thin coating of surficial dust was removed or disrupted as the dust devil advanced. Dust devils most commonly form after noon on days when the martian air is still (that is, when there isn't even a faint breeze). On such days, the ground is better able to heat up the air immediately above the surface. As the warmed near-surface air begins to rise, it also begins to spin, creating a vortex. The spinning column then moves across the surface and picks up loose dust (if any is present). The dust makes the vortex visible and gives it a tornado-like appearance. The dust devil in this image has a very short, dark shadow cast to the right of the bright column; this shadow is short because the sun was nearly overhead. Image courtesy: NASA.
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martian dust devils From the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC):
At The center right of this image (above left) is a dust devil that, on May 21, 2002, was seen climbing the wall of a crater at 4.1°S, 9.5°W. This crater (above right) is in western Terra Meridiani. The dust devil was moving toward the northeast (upper right), leaving behind a dark trail where a thin coating of surficial dust was removed or disrupted as the dust devil advanced. Dust devils most commonly form after noon on days when the martian air is still (that is, when there isn't even a faint breeze). On such days, the ground is better able to heat up the air immediately above the surface. As the warmed near-surface air begins to rise, it also begins to spin, creating a vortex. The spinning column then moves across the surface and picks up loose dust (if any is present). The dust makes the vortex visible and gives it a tornado-like appearance. The dust devil in this image has a very short, dark shadow cast to the right of the bright column; this shadow is short because the sun was nearly overhead. Image courtesy: NASA.
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historical photoAug. 29, 1967: Arrival and installation of Titan Vehicle for testing in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory N-242. NASA Photo by Charlie Lonzo.
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historical photoAug. 29, 1967: Arrival and installation of Titan Vehicle for testing in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory N-242. NASA Photo by Charlie Lonzo.
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historical photoOct. 20, 1970: Atlas vehicle installation in vacuum tower of Structural Dynamics Laboratory N-242. NASA Photo by Jim Remington.
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All images courtesy NASA Ames Research Center, Dom Hart, unless otherwise stated.