Educator Features

You Can Be the Coolest Teacher in the School!
03.03.05
The back of the new Pokemon card featuring Deoxys
How many times have you had to remind students to put away the games and get back to work? Do they bring in action heroes and trading cards from home? Wouldn't it be something if the trading cards and action heroes were part of the day's lesson? Yes, you'd be the coolest teacher in the school -- the teacher every child wants to have.

Here's your opportunity. NASA and the Pokémon Trading Card Game: EX Deoxys are collaborating to promote science, math and engineering for students. The latest Pokémon Trading Card Game: EX Deoxys, is in stores now. This will be your opportunity to teach children about the real-world science behind this Pokémon Trading Card Game.

Image to right: Deoxys is a new Pokémon character in the Trading Card Game, and there is real science behind its story!

Imagine your students' reaction to this classroom activity: You'll explain that Deoxys is a space virus with extraordinary origins. It came from space and mutated into a Pokémon when exposed to a laser beam. Deoxys is a new Pokémon character in the Trading Card Game, and there is real science behind its story. Many aspects of Deoxys reflect its viral nature, and its name is derived from deoxyribonucleic acid -- short for DNA, the genetic material of living organisms, including some viruses. There are many things about viruses that are unknown, and it's true of Deoxys, too! Children already know about Pokémon from the trading card game and video games, so they'll be excited to see Pokémon in class!

The Deoxys program will help build the workforce of tomorrow by encouraging young people to see that fun, science and technology go together. As the teacher, you will have access to background information and activities designed to use hobbies to teach science. By registering for the program produced by the NASA Langley Center for Distance Learning, you'll receive activities and programs to use in your class.

Deoxys in defense mode
NASA and the Pokémon Trading Card Game: EX Deoxys will help teachers use these activity units in the classroom. Students will use real science and the Pokémon Trading Card Game characters to learn about viruses, extraterrestrials (hint: rather than alien beings, extraterrestrials are more likely to be microscopic creatures), meteorites, DNA and the ozone layer. Units will meet National Science Education Standards in Life Science, Earth and Space Science, Science and Technology, Science in Personal and Social Perspectives, and Science as Inquiry categories.

Image to left: Deoxys is a new Pokémon character in the Trading Card Game, and there is real science behind its story!

To find the background information and the Pokémon Trading Card Game: EX Deoxys activities, visit the NASA Web site. You'll be able to download everything to get students involved. You can also contact NASA Langley's Distance Learning Center at dlcenter+mail@larc.nasa.gov or 757-864-6100.

TEACHER TIP: A simple check for understanding might be to play "Two Truths and a Lie" with your students. After studying the scientific background information with your class, ask them to write three statements about a topic. Instruct them to write one false statement and two true statements. Have them trade papers with a classmate and challenge them to identify the truths and the lie.

For more information on the NASA and Pokémon Trading Card Game collaboration, visit:
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For more information on NASA Langley Center for Distance Learning programs, visit:
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For more information on the NASA Press Release, visit:
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Pokémon Trading Card Game and NASA Langley Center for Distance Learning have partnered to bring you these resources designed to use kids' hobbies to teach real world science. NASA does not endorse the Pokémon Trading Card Game, movie, characters, or related items. © 2005 Pokémon. © 1995-2005 Nintendo/Creatures Inc./GAME FREAK inc. ™ and ® are trademarks of Nintendo.

NASA Education Technology Services (NETS) team written in cooperation with NASA's Kids Science News Network (KSNN).