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Space Biosciences: Past Missions

Rodent Research-1 (SpaceX-4)

NASA's Rodent Research Hardware System provides a research platform aboard the International Space Station for long-duration rodent experiments in space. Such experiments will examine how microgravity affects the rodents, providing information relevant to human spaceflight, discoveries in basic biology, and knowledge that can help treat human disease on Earth.

RR1 logo

Seedling Growth-2 (SpaceX-4)

Seedling Growth-2 is the second in a series of joint NASA-European Space Agency (ESA) science missions to study light- and gravity-signaling in plants. Results from this research have potential uses both for improving the long-term sustainability of agricultural production on Earth and also for developing plant-based bio-regenerative life support systems needed for humans to colonize other worlds, such as the moon and Mars.

Bion-M1 logo

AFEx (SpaceX-4)

The purpose of the Ames student Fruit-Fly Experiment (AFEx) is to gain a better understanding of relationship between oxidative stress and neurobehavioral adaptation to microgravity in the fruit fly—Drosophila melanogaster. This experiment is the result of a collaboration with the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research, which initiated this project to give college students hands-on experience doing an experiment in space.

AFEx hardware

Micro-8 (SpaceX-4)

Micro-8 examines how spaceflight affects potentially infectious organisms. Specifically, Micro-8 assesses gene expression, morphology and virulence responses of a yeast strain, Candida albicans (C. albicans), following exposure to spaceflight.

Yeast

T-Cell Activation in Aging (SpaceX-3)

T-Cell Activation In Aging is an investigation of the genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie diminished T-cell activation that both occurs in the aging population and also in astronauts.

T-Cell-1 logo

Micro-7 (SpaceX-3)

Micro-7 is the first spaceflight study of gene and microRNA expression in confluent (non-dividing) cells. The study is also an investigation of how spaceflight affects the response of non-dividing cells to DNA damage.

Micro-7 logo

SporeSat (SpaceX-3)

SporeSat is an autonomous, free-flying spacecraft that will be used to conduct a scientific experiment to investigate how germinating plant cells sense and respond to gravity.

SporeSat drawing

HEART FLIES (SpaceX-3)

The Heart Effect Analysis Research Team conducting FLy Investigations and Experiments in Spaceflight (HEART FLIES)investigation is the first investigation to use the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, to study the effects of spaceflight on the structure and function of the heart.

HEART FLIES experiment

Bion-M1

NASA's participation in the Bion-M1 mission continues the 30+-year history of collaborative research between NASA and the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow. Bion-M1 is a cooperative research mission in which nine U.S. investigators are working with Russian investigators to conduct the experiments and participate in a biospecimen sharing program.

Bion-M1 logo

Cell Biology Tech Demo (SpaceX-2)

NASA is developing new hardware to enable long duration cell biology research in space. The goal of the Cell Biology Tech Demo was to demonstrate critical Bioculture System component crew operations aboard the International Space Station and the ability of hardware components to interface with existing space station laboratory facilities.

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Seedling Growth-1 (SpaceX-2)

Seedling Growth-1 is the first in a series of joint NASA-European Space Agency (ESA) experiments aiming to help us understand plant growth in space.

Seedling Growth Mission Patch

Micro-6 (SpaceX-1)

The Micro-6 investigation examined how spaceflight affects the yeast Candida albicans, a microbe that normally helps us maintain a healthy personal ecosystem in our bodies. However, when our immune systems are stressed, C. albicans can grow out of control. Results from this study will help researchers understand if yeasts are more infectious after exposure to a microgravity environment and, if so, how they have changed.

Candida
OMEGA  The Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA) system is an "ecology of technologies" in which the concept of waste disappears. A waste product from one part of the system becomes a resource for another part. As far as possible the whole system, which includes the environment, is in balance. For example, the system uses algae to treat wastewater and wastewater to grow algae. Omega Patch

Ultrasound 2 (STS-135)

The Ultrasound 2 system is the next generation device which has replaced the existing Ultrasound system aboard the International Space Station. The new system is being used on the station in support of the Human Research Program’s International Space Station Medical Project and medical operations.

USND 2

Plant Signaling (STS-135)

The Plant Signaling experiment studied the effects of microgravity on plant growth. During long-term space exploration it will be necessary to provide astronauts with regenerative sources of food. As new information about how plants grown in microgravity emerges, sustainable plant-based life support systems may be developed.

Plant  SignalingSTS-135

CBTM-3 (STS-135)

Commercial Biomedical Test Module-3 is a collaboration between NASA's Ames Research Center, BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Amgen.  This investigation will evaluate a novel therapeutic countermeasure to prevent flight induced bone loss in mice.

CBTM.3 Team Photo

Space Tissue Loss-2 (STS-135)

Space Tissue Loss is a collaboration between NASA's Ames Research Center, the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center in Ft. Detrick, Maryland and the Department of Defense's Space Test Program in Houston.

Space Tissue

Micro-2A (STS-135)

There is an urgent need to understand the effects of microgravity on the growth, cellular physiology, and cell-cell interactions in microbial biofilms. This information can then be used to curtail harmful activities of microbial consortia thriving as biofilms on the International Space Station and for the long-term success of human space exploration.

Micro-2A logo

Micro-4 (STS-135)

Micro-4 is a collaboration with BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The study uses special genetically engineered yeast cells to understand how they respond to the physical effects of microgravity to determine the specific strain optimal for spaceflight. Results from this study allow researchers to gain a global perspective on the genes that play a role in survival under microgravity conditions and will allow for a more thorough understanding of the effects of microgravity on living systems.

Micro-4 (STS-135)

Treadmill Kinematic Experiment

On April 22, 2011, S. Hing the Flight Project/Experiment Support Manager for the Human Research Program's Treadmill Kinematic Experiment began monitoring the first of 36 on orbit experiment sessions from the Multi Mission Operations Center at Ames.

Kinematic

Mouse Immunology-2 (STS-133)

When space shuttle Discovery launched into orbit on March 24, 2011 for its final mission it carried 16 mice in hardware developed by NASA's Ames Research Center for an immune system research study. The goal of the study was to discover how exposure to the conditions of spaceflight lead to an increased susceptibility to infectious disease. 

Micro-2 (STS-132)

There is an urgent need to understand the effects of microgravity on the growth, cellular physiology, and cell-cell interactions in microbial biofilms. This information can then be used to curtail harmful activities of microbial consortia thriving as biofilms on the International Space Station and for the long-term success of human space exploration. 

Micro-2 (STS-132) logo

Mouse Immunology (STS-131)

This experiment contributed toward attaining a better understanding of how the immune system responds to the microgravity environment.

Mouse Immunology (STS-131) patch

Space Tissue Loss (STS-131)

Space Tissue Loss was a collaboration between NASA's Ames Research Center, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the Department of Defense's Space Test Program.

STS-131 STL Patch

TROPI-2 (STS-130)

The TROPI-2 mission is a continuation of the TROPI-1 experiment. The major goals of this research are to better understand cellular mechanisms of phototropism in plants and to determine the effects of gravity on light perception in plants.                                                                

TROPI-2 (STS-130) logo

Holter Monitor 2 (STS-126)

The next generation Holter Monitor 2  is a commercial off the shelf ECG monitoring device developed by Mortara Instruments and flight qualified for use on the International Space Station by the Space Biosciences Division of NASA's Ames Research Center.

Holter Monitor 2 (STS-126) logo

Foton-M3

The Flight Systems Implementation Branch developed hardware enhancements including video recording and water delivery capabilities for the newt and gecko space biology experiments for the Russian Foton-M3 mission launched onboard the Soyuz-U rocket September 14, 2007 from Kazakhstan.

Foton-M3

SPEGIS (STS-118)

The Streptococcus Pneumoniae Expression of Genes In Space (SPEGIS) experiment investigated the effects of the space environment on the gene expression and production of important virulence proteins of the human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae.

STS-118 Crew Patch

CBTM-2 (STS-118)

Commercial Biomedical Testing Module-2 (CBTM-2) payload was a collaboration with NASA's Ames Reseach Center who was the hardware provider, BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and Amgen, a commercial partner which tested a muscle wasting inhibitor compound.

CBTM 2

Microbe (STS 115)

The Microbe experiment tested three microbial pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans, to determine the effect of spaceflight on microbial virulence and gene expression. The results indicate that bacteria respond to the microgravity environment with widespread alterations of gene expression, alterations in microbial morphology and increased virulence.

STS 115 patch

TROPI (STS-121)

This research will provide a better understand cellular mechanisms of phototropism in plants and will help to determine the effects of gravity on light perception in plants.

TROPI (STS-121) logo

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Page Last Updated: January 23rd, 2015
Page Editor: Yael Kovo