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New Views From NASA's Spirit Rover
09.01.05
 
Postcard Above Tennessee Valley
mini panorama taken by Spirit just as rover finally completed climb up Husband Hill

Image above: This "postcard" or 2-inch mini-panorama was taken by NASA's Spirit rover on martian day, or sol, 582 (August 23, 2005), just as the rover finally completed its intrepid climb up Husband Hill. The summit appears to be a windswept plateau of scattered rocks, little sand dunes and small exposures of outcrop. The breathtaking view here is toward the north, looking down into the drifts and outcrops of the "Tennessee Valley," a region that Spirit was not able to visit during its climb to the top of the hill.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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Spirit's Spectacular View From the Summit
approximate true-color panorama taken by Spirit once it reached top of Husband Hill

Image above: This approximate true-color panorama was taken by NASA's Spirit rover after it successfully trekked to the top of "Husband Hill," in the "Columbia Hills" of Gusev Crater. The "little rover that could" spent the last 14 months climbing the hills in both the forward and reverse directions to reduce wear on its wheels. This breathtaking view from the summit reveals previously hidden terrain to the south, where team members hope to direct Spirit in the future.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
+ Larger image | + Full caption/ high resolution image | View time lapse movie of Spirit's panorama (18.4 Mb QuickTime)

Top of the World
one of first panoramas Spirit took upon reaching summit of Husband Hill, revealing vast landscape previously hidden behind Columbia Hills

Image above: This panorama is one of the first that NASA's Spirit rover snapped upon reaching the summit of "Husband Hill," located in "Columbia Hills" in Gusev Crater, Mars. It reveals the vast landscape to the east previously hidden behind the Columbia Hills. The rim of "Thira Crater" frames the distant horizon some 15 kilometers (9.3 miles) away. The summit area is divided by a shallow saddle that slopes north (left) into an area called "Tennessee Valley." Large amounts of sandy material have been blown up the valley and across the saddle in the left-to-right direction, creating the rippled piles of sand seen in this image.

The science team will examine bedrock and other materials in the summit area to determine their composition and the orientation of the rock layers. These and other observations will provide clues to how the rocks formed and how the hills were sculpted in the geologic past.
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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'Independence Panorama'
Spirit image taken near summit of Husband Hill, which is near right side of panorama

Image above: This is the Spirit "Independence" panorama, acquired on martian days, or sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the "Columbia Hills" near the summit of "Husband Hill." The summit of "Husband Hill" is the peak near the right side of this panorama and is about 100 meters (328 feet) away from the rover and about 30 meters (98 feet) higher in elevation. The rocky outcrops downhill and on the left side of this mosaic include "Larry's Lookout" and "Cumberland Ridge," which Spirit explored in April, May, and June of 2005
Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell
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