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Now We're Tracking: NASA's ASF Software and Hurricanes
01.04.06
 
Technologist Jeff Hosler watches the progress of three rovers as they go about the business of gathering scientific data.Image to right: From his control room high above the simulated Martian landscape at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., technologist Jeff Hosler watches the progress of three rovers as they go about the business of gathering scientific data. The rovers, built by Carnegie Mellon University, are controlled by the Adaptive Sensor Fleet (ASF) technology, a software system that guides fleets of data-gathering platforms, such as robots, to areas where scientists need up-to-the-minute scientific measurements. Credit: NASA






This bird's eye image shows the three rovers as they navigate the simulated Martian landscape at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.Image to left: This bird’s eye image shows the three rovers as they navigate the simulated Martian landscape at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The rovers are controlled by the Adaptive Sensor Fleet (ASF) technology, developed by Goddard technologists. With ASF, scientists can identify a target or area where they need data, and the system’s “fleet manager” divides the work among the different ASF-equipped platforms, which then set out to gather the data. The system is ideal for use in remote locations because it requires little or no human oversight. Credit: NASA



















Adaptive sensor fleet rovers.Image to right: Although the Adaptive Sensor Fleet technology was demonstrated with Mars-type rovers, technologists believe the technology has wider application on Earth — at least in the near term. They believe oceanographers, meteorologists, and others could equip ocean-faring craft with the technology to gather ocean temperature and other data needed for hurricane prediction. Credit: NASA











Under a NASA and NOAAImage to left: Under a NASA and NOAA-funded effort, scientists at the Wallops Flight Facility developed the Ocean-Atmosphere Sensor Integration System (OASIS) platform. Once integrated with the ASF control system, fleets of these platforms could gather up-to-the-minute local data about ocean conditions — factors that determine the path and ferocity of hurricanes. Credit: NASA











This image of Hurricane Wilma was taken at 8:22 a.m. CDT Wednesday, Oct. 19, by the crew aboard NASA's international space station as the complex flew 222 miles above the storm.Image to right: This image of Hurricane Wilma was taken at 8:22 a.m. CDT Wednesday, Oct. 19, by the crew aboard NASA's international space station as the complex flew 222 miles above the storm. At the time, Wilma was the strongest Atlantic hurricane in history, with winds near 175 miles per hour. The storm was located in the Caribbean Sea, 340 miles southeast of Cozumel, Mexico. Credit: NASA