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NASA - THEMIS/AIM Science Writer's Workshop
May 19, 2006
 

Introduction


Whether it's taking a baby picture of the universe with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), or detecting the brightest explosions in the Universe with SWIFT, NASA's Explorer program has made some of the biggest scientific discoveries. This fall, NASA plans to launch two new Explorer missions, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM). The THEMIS mission plans to unravel the tantalizing mystery behind auroral substorms, an avalanche of magnetic energy powered by the solar wind that intensifies the northern and southern lights. THEMIS will help us understand how and why these space storms create havoc on satellites, power grids, and communication systems The AIM mission seeks to explain why mysterious brilliant silvery blue clouds keep appearing at the edge of space in the mesosphere. To what extent does the Sun control the dramatic variability seen in these clouds? Are these clouds, which did not exist a century ago, a temperature gauge for climate change? Come to this science writer workshop to learn why these missions are so important to understanding how solar activity affects the Earth.
 


Panelists

+ Joseph A. Dezio, Deputy Program Manager, NASA Explorer Program

+ Dr. Vassilis Angelopolous, University of California, Berkeley

+ Dr. James Russell, Hampton University, Hampton, Va




Resources


All three presentations are in Adobe PDF Format. For a free download of Adobe Acrobat Reader, visit:
+ Free Acrobat Download
 

 

Joe Dezio's first slide from his presentation
J. Dezio's Presentation
Vassilis Angelopoulos' first slide from his presentation
V. Angelopoulos' Presentation
Jim Russell's first slide from his presentation
J. Russell's Presentation

Contact Information

Erica Hupp
NASA Headquarters
Washington, DC
Phone: 202/358-1237
Rani Chohan
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, Maryland
Phone: 301/286-2483



Event Information

Science Writer's Workshop: Upcoming AIM and THEMIS Missions to Study Earth's Atmosphere
Time: May 25, 10:00 a.m. EDT, Room 323
Session: ED33A, SM41A, IN43A, SA52A

This workshop explains why two upcoming NASA missions are important to understanding how solar activity affects the Earth. The Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission plans to unravel the mystery behind auroral substorms, magnetic energy powered by the solar wind that intensifies the northern and southern lights. THEMIS will help us understand how these space storms create havoc on satellites, power grids, and communication systems. The Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission seeks to explain why mysterious brilliant silvery blue clouds keep appearing at the edge of space in the mesosphere.
 

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