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NASA FACT?

NASA has launched every weather satellite. After launch, the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) are then managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). GOES satellites monitor storm development and track their movements and provide imagery that television weather forecasters use for all kinds of storms including extreme storms like hurricanes.


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+ NASA Home > Life on Earth > Looking at Earth

  LATEST NEWS
 
 Caring for people continues to be the focus of NASA’s Stennis Space Center (SSC) in response to Hurricane Katrina, more than three weeks after the storm devastated the Mississippi and Louisiana Gulf Coast.

There was no significant damage to any of the stands where SSC has tested and proven flight-worthy all Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) since 1975. SSC is open and operating at a modified level of business.

“Our top priority is helping our employees and their families and helping facilitate the massive relief effort being staged by Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Defense, and other agencies from Stennis Space Center,” said SSC Center Director Bill Parsons, who is leading NASA’s hurricane recovery efforts.

+ Read Full Press Release

Space Station Photos Show Katrina's Impact

Michoud Assembly Facility from the International Space Station Image above: NASA's Michoud Test Facility in New Orleans is located at right center of this image taken from the International Space Station on September 8. While the facility itself is largely dry, the adjacent neighborhoods are extensively flooded. Photo credit: NASA.

New Orleans from the International Space Station Image above: This September 8 image from Station showsflooded areas (dark greenish brown) to the west and southwest of the famous French Quarter (top center). Damage to the roof of the Superdome is visible to the left of center. Photo credit: NASA.
+ View More ISS Images

Photo Galleries: + Stennis Damage | + Michoud Damage
+ All Katrina Images | + Video: Katrina's Path

Additional Links:

+ Administrator Griffin Updates Employees (80 Kb PDF)
+ Media Teleconference on Katrina's Impact (111 Kb PDF)
+ Impact on Space Shuttle Work
+ NASA and Hurricane Rita + Hurricane Resource Page

 
  LATEST NEWS
 
 Chlorophyll concentration in the water during the time of Hurricane Katrina.
Satellite Sees Chlorophyll Stirred up by Hurricane Katrina
Wind and wave action from Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 stirred up sediments and chlorophyll off the Florida coast.
+ Read More
 
 Thumbnail image of the eyewall of Hurricane Rita.
Hurricane Cloud Tops Give Windy Clues
NASA finding that cloud tops provide clues about the behavior of winds below a hurricane on the Earth's surface.
+ Read More
 
 Photo of Dr. Joanne Simpson
NASA Hurricane Specialist Joanne Simpson Honored by American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Dr. Joanne Simpson became a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on April 24.
+ Read More
 
  RELATED LINKS 
 
 + Stennis Recovery Alert

+ Stennis Supporting Recovery Efforts

+ Hurricane Help for the Long Haul | + Video

+ NASA Employees Help Hurricane-Ravaged Areas

+ Status of NASA Facilities

+ Donate to the NASA Families Assistance Fund

+ FirstGov: How to Find People or Donate to Help Victims

+ Message From Administrator Griffin on Disaster Relief

+ Federal Emergency Management Agency

+ Link to NOAA's National Hurricane Center

+ NOAA Hurricane Preparedness web site

+ USGS Storm Flood Tracking

 


  RELATED MULTIMEDIA 
 
  Icon for the Hurricane Multimedia gallery

Icon to take users to the Birth of a Hurricane video. The video is close captioned.

Icon for long movie entitled Looking at Hurricanes. This movie is 8 minutes long to view and is close captioned.

Icon for the Why and How of Hurricane Hunting paper

+ Behold a Whirlwind Came: The Science of Tracking Hurricanes

+ Hurricane Images in the Visible Earth image collection

+ Additional Images

+ Additional Video

 




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Last Updated: November 30, 2007
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