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Media Teleconference: Exploring Sea Ice, Climate Warming Link
09.13.06
 
Introduction

Researchers have suggested for some time that the icy surface of the Arctic's waters, or sea ice, is retreating because of an ever-warming climate. Sea ice is an indicator of changing water, air, and sea surface temperatures, and is important to the well being of Arctic mammals such as polar bears.

With the annual minimum perennial sea ice period less than a month away, a representative from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), Boulder, Colo., will present the latest on the state of summer Arctic sea ice. Scientists from NSIDC and NASA will answer questions such as: Is wintertime Arctic sea ice also showing significant signs of change? How might earlier spring Arctic sea ice break-up affect polar bear populations?

NASA hosts a teleconference for the media on Sept. 13, 2006 at 1 p.m. Eastern on this topic. This conference will be archived for a short time at 888-568-0871.

Briefing Participants

+ Mark Serreze, senior research scientist, National Snow and Ice Data Center
+ Josefino Comiso, senior research scientist, Cryospheric Sciences Branch, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
+ Claire Parkinson, senior research scientist, Cryospheric Sciences Branch, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Briefing Multimedia

+ Media Teleconference Multimedia Items for Reporters

Video File

A video file will run on the NASA-TV media channel (#103) at 3 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 13 and 14, 2006. For NASA TV information and schedules on the Web, visit: www.nasa.gov/ntv

Related Links

Features
+ Slow Retreat of Sea Ice Lengthens Arctic Polar Bear Fast
+ Arctic Sea Ice Hitting Major Lows in Wintertime
+ NASA Sees Rapid Changes in Arctic Sea Ice
Press Releases
+ NASA Sees Rapid Changes In Arctic Sea Ice
Science Papers
+ Abrupt Decline in the Arctic Winter Sea Ice Cover by Josefino Comiso; Geophysical Research Letters, 2006 (.pdf file)
+ Possible Effects of Climate Warming on Selected Populations of Polar Bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Canadian Arctic by Ian Stirling and Claire Parkinson; Arctic, September 2006 (.pdf file)
+ Satellite-Observed Changes in the Arctic by Claire Parkinson and Josefino Comiso; Physics Today, August 2004 (.pdf file)
Web Stories
+ NSIDC Arctic Sea Ice News 2006
+ New Test of Snow's Thickness May 'Bear' Results Key to Polar Climate Studies, Wildlife Habitat
+ Arctic Sea Ice Continues to Decline, Arctic Temperatures Continue to Rise In 2005
+ NSIDC Arctic Sea Ice Decline, Arctic Temperature Rise in 2005

Public Affairs Contacts to Arrange Interviews

Sarah Dewitt
NASA-TV, Goddard Space Flight Center
Erica Hupp
NASA Headquarters
Rob Gutro
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Alan Buis
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Stephanie Renfrow
National Snow and Ice Data Center
Ian Stirling
Canadian Wildlife Service
 
 
Polar Bear Photo Courtesy of Robert Taylor