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NASA 'Puts the Squeeze' on a Large Rocket Test Section
03.23.11
 
This graphic from the video image correlation system shows shell wall displacement at the end of the loading sequence of the March 23, 2001 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Test. This graphic from the video image correlation system shows shell wall displacement at the end of the loading sequence of the March 23, 2011 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor Test. Red represents an outward wall displacement of approx. 1 inch outward. Purple shows an inward displacement of approx. 3 inches inches. (NASA)

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View from a test camera inside the cylinder from the March 23 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor test at NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center. View from a test camera inside the cylinder from the March 23 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor test at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The shadowed areas are buckled regions of the aluminum-lithium test article. (NASA/MSFC)


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Reinforcing rib stiffeners buckled under the approx. one million pounds of load applied to the test article during the March 23 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor test at Marshall Space Flight Center. Reinforcing rib stiffeners buckled under the approx. one million pounds of load applied to the test article during the March 23 Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor test at Marshall Space Flight Center. Buckling forced these stiffeners to tear from the barrel "skin" triggering permanent deformations. (NASA)


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Engineers review real-time data from the March 23, 2011 can crush test for NASA. Mark Hilburger, senior research engineer in the Structural Mechanics and Concepts Branch at Langley and the principal investigator of the NESC's Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project and Mike Roberts, an engineer in Marshall's structural strength test branch and the center lead for this activity review real-time data from the March 23, 2011 "can crush" test. (NASA/MSFC/D. Higginbotham)

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The Marshall Center Engineering Test Laboratory, the site of the Marsh 23 can crush test Mark Hilburger, senior research engineer in the Structural Mechanics and Concepts Branch at Langley and the principal investigator of the NESC's Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project talks with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden as he toured Marshall's Marshall's Engineering Test Laboratory the site of the Marsh 23 "can crush" test. Mike Roberts, an engineer in Marshall's structural strength test branch and the center lead for this activity looks on.
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Mark Hilburger and Charlie Bolden Mark Hilburger and Charlie Bolden.




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Mark Hilburger, Charlie Bolden, Mike Roberts and Clint Cragg, principle engineer at the NESC Mark Hilburger, Charlie Bolden, Mike Roberts and Clint Cragg, principle engineer at the NESC.




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Bolden, Roberts and Hilburger. Hilburger explains the physics of cylindrical buckling using a water bottle as example. Bolden, Roberts and Hilburger. Hilburger explains the physics of cylindrical buckling using a water bottle as example.



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Roberts, Cragg, Bolden, Hilburger Cragg, Bolden, Hilburger.




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Robert Bobo, branch chief of Marshall's structural strength test branch,. Bolden, Hilburger, Cragg and Courtney Flugstad, NESC Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project manager. Robert Bobo, branch chief of Marshall's structural strength test branch,. Bolden, Hilburger, Cragg and Courtney Flugstad, NESC Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project manager.



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Robert Lightfoot, George Olden, Courtney Flugstad,  Clint Cragg, Charles Bolden, Mike Roberts, Mark Hilburger Robert Lightfoot, Marshall Center director, George Olden, test engineer in Marshall's Structural Strength Branch, Courtney Flugstad, NESC Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project manager, Clint Cragg, NESC principle engineer, Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator, Mike Roberts, engineer in Marshall's Structural Strength Test branch and the center Shell Buckling lead, and Mark Hilburger, senior research engineer in the Structural Mechanics and Concepts Branch at Langley and the principal investigator of the NESC's Shell Buckling Knockdown Factor project.
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Michael Braukus/J. D. Harrington, 202-358-1979/5241
Headquarters, Washington
michael.j.braukus@nasa.gov / j.d.harrington@nasa.gov

Jennifer Stanfield, 256-544-7199
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Ala.
Jennifer.Stanfield@nasa.gov