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Hi-C Views the Solar Corona
07.20.12
 
Hi C has captured the highest resolution images ever taken of the corona of the sun in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. NASA's High Resolution Coronal Imager, or Hi-C, captured the highest-resolution images ever taken of the sun's corona in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. The innovative telescope, launched on a sounding rocket at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico July 11, 2012, focused on a large active region on the sun. The resulting images reveal the dynamic structure of the solar atmosphere in the finest detail ever seen. (NASA)
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AIA can see structures on the surface of the sun with clarity of approximately 675 miles and observes the sun in ten wavelengths of light. AIA can see structures on the sun's surface with clarity of approximately 675 miles and observes the sun in ten wavelengths of light. Hi-C observed features down to roughly 135 miles and observed the sun in just one wavelength. The clarity of the images will help scientists better understand the behavior of the solar atmosphere and its impacts on Earth's space environment. (NASA)

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Shown in green to enhance detail, these Hi C images reveal detailed tangles of magnetic field, channeling the solar plasma into a range of complex structures. NASA's High Resolution Coronal Imager, or Hi-C, captured the highest-resolution images ever taken of the sun's corona in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength. Shown in green to enhance detail, Hi-C's images reveal detailed tangles of magnetic field, channeling the solar plasma into a range of complex structures. Hi-C's resolution is five times more detailed than the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly flying aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO. AIA can see structures on the sun's surface with clarity of approximately 675 miles and observes the sun in ten wavelengths of light. Hi-C observed features down to roughly 135 miles and observed the sun in just one wavelength. The clarity of the images will help scientists better understand the behavior of the solar atmosphere and its impacts on Earth's space environment. (NASA)
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Members of the NASA Hi C team prepare to recover the telescope at White Sands Missile Range on July 11, 2012. Members of NASA's Hi-C team prepare to recover the one-of-a-kind telescope at White Sands Missile Range following the sounding rocket's successful launch on July 11, 2012. Left to right: Eduardo Langman, telemetry engineer, Orbital Sciences; Ken McCracken, mechanical engineer, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Jonathan Cirtain principal investigator and Dyana Beabout, software engineer, both from NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. (NASA)
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On July 11, 2012, Hi C was successfully launched on a Black Brant sounding rocket from the White Sands Missile Range at White Sands, N.M. On July 11, 2012, at 12:50 MDT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, or Hi-C, was successfully launched on a Black Brant sounding rocket from the White Sands Missile Range at White Sands, N.M. Hi-C is a next-generation suborbital space telescope designed to capture high-resolution images of the million-degree solar corona. (NASA)

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