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Arctic 2010 Sea Ice Maximum, Visualized
04.06.10
 
Sea ice coverage over the Arctic Ocean oscillates over the course of a year, growing through winter and reaching a maximum extent by February or March. This year, Arctic sea ice grew to levels beyond those measured in recent years but slightly below average when compared to the 30-year satellite record.

What does the 2010 sea ice extent look like and how is NASA studying it? To find out, view NASA's updated sea ice animation and watch a video interview with polar scientist Lora Koenig of NASA's Goddard Space Flight center in Greenbelt, Md.

Sea Ice maximum 2010


Arctic sea ice and seasonal land cover change are shown from Sept. 1, 2009, when sea ice in the Arctic was near its minimum extent, through March 30, 2010, the day before sea ice reached its 2010 maximum extent. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio.
> High resolution still (10 Mb)
> Click to view various formats of the video

On April 2, 2010, NASA Goddard cryospheric scientist Lora Koenig spoke with TV stations across the United States regarding NASA's Operation IceBridge mission and the 2010 Arctic sea ice maximum.


On April 2, 2010, NASA Goddard cryospheric scientist Lora Koenig spoke with TV stations across the United States regarding NASA's Operation IceBridge mission and the 2010 Arctic sea ice maximum. Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
> Click to view various formats of the video

Related Links:

> National Snow and Ice Data Center: Wintry Weather Causes Late Season Growth Spurt
> Satellites Show Arctic Literally on Thin Ice
 
 
Kathryn Hansen
NASA's Earth Science News Team