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RETURN TO FLIGHT
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STS-114 CREW AND MISSION
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LAUNCH AND LANDING
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The Space Shuttle processing flow begins at the end of each mission, when the orbiter lands at Kennedy or arrives back at Kennedy following a landing at an alternate landing site.


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MISSION INFORMATION
Payload and Launch Processing

07.25.05

25 July 2005
Space Shuttle Discovery is at Launch Pad 39B undergoing final inspections and preparations for tomorrow's Return to Flight launch attempt at 10:39 a.m. to the International Space Station. The countdown clock is in a scheduled built-in hold at T-11 hours (Time Minus 11 hours) and will pick up at 5:44 p.m. EDT tonight.

Loading of the Power Reactant Storage Distribution system is complete. This is the operation where the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for the fuel cells is loaded on Discovery. The fuel cells provide power to the electrical systems while the Shuttle is in orbit. The byproduct is drinking water. The Rotating Service Structure will be rotated away from Discovery this afternoon at 1:30 p.m. in preparation for launch.

The STS-114 crew arrived at Kennedy Space Center on Friday. Since Friday, Commander Eileen Collins and Pilot Jim Kelly have been practicing orbiter approaches and landings in the Shuttle Training Aircraft. The crew is scheduled to wake up just after midnight tonight and will leave Crew Quarters for the launch pad at 6:49 a.m. tomorrow.

Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ships Liberty Star and Freedom Star departed from KSC yesterday and are traveling to their location for launch, about 140 nautical miles downrange of the launch pad.

Today, the L-1 day weather forecast shows that the probability of weather prohibiting the launch of Discovery is 40 percent, with the probability of weather prohibiting tanking at only five percent. Temperature at launch time is forecast at 84 degrees and a relative humidity of 77 percent.

14 July 2005
Space Shuttle managers say the launch of NASA's Space Shuttle Return to Flight mission, STS-114, will take place no earlier than Sunday, July 17. If Space Shuttle Discovery does launch Sunday, it would lift off at 2:14 p.m. EDT.

Mission Management Team and engineering meetings took place last night and today at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Team members reviewed data and possible troubleshooting plans for the liquid hydrogen tank low-level fuel cut-off sensor. The sensor failed a routine prelaunch check during the launch countdown yesterday afternoon, causing mission managers to scrub Discovery's first launch attempt. The sensor protects the Shuttle's main engines by triggering their shutdown in the event fuel runs unexpectedly low. The sensor is one of four inside the liquid hydrogen section of the External Tank (ET).

A new official launch date will be scheduled once a troubleshooting plan is complete and engineers are working on a solution. Space Shuttle Program managers plan a series of meetings tomorrow to discuss the problem and finalize the troubleshooting plan.

The launch control team began troubleshooting while the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen were drained from the ET last night. The No. 2 liquid hydrogen sensor in the External Tank's liquid hydrogen tank continued to read "wet" and did not transition to a "dry" indication once the tank was completely drained. Following detanking operations, the same commands that were sent during the launch countdown were repeated while draining. While going through commands, sensor No. 2 continued to show "wet" instead of "dry." The firing room then reissued commands and the sensor went to "dry" as it should have. Another round of commands was sent and sensor No. 2 performed as expected, with all sensors in the "dry" state.

Space Shuttle Discovery remains at Launch Pad 39B. The Rotating Service Structure was rotated back around the vehicle last night.

The STS-114 crew, led by Commander Eileen Collins, remains at Kennedy Space Center while engineers assess the problem. During their 12-day Return to Flight mission to the International Space Station, Discovery's seven crew members will test new techniques and equipment designed to make Space Shuttle missions safer. They'll also deliver supplies and make repairs to the Space Station.

12 July 2005
The countdown to launch Discovery remains on schedule for Wednesday at 3:51 p.m. EDT.

Just one day prior to the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery, closeouts and procedures are finalized for the liftoff of the Return to Flight mission, STS-114, to the International Space Station. The countdown clock is in a scheduled built-in hold at T-11 hours (Time Minus 11 hours) and will pick up at 11 p.m. EDT tonight.

At about 5 p.m. today during routine closeouts at the launch pad, the cover of Discovery's window number seven, one of the overhead crew cabin windows, fell about 65 feet and hit a carrier panel on the left Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pod, damaging several tiles. The tiles were on a single carrier panel, which fits over the area. A spare carrier panel was taken to the pad and used to replace the damaged panel. The replacement procedure took about an hour to complete.

This operation impacted the planned roll back of the Rotating Service Structure from 7 p.m. to about 8:30 p.m.

The launch on Wednesday will not be impacted as a result. The countdown is in a planned, built-in hold at the T-11 hour mark. No other issues are being tracked by the launch team.

Loading of the Power Reactant Storage Distribution system is complete. This is the operation where the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for the fuel cells is loaded on Discovery. The fuel cells provide power to the electrical systems while the Shuttle is in orbit. The byproduct is drinking water. Setup and checkouts of the Space Shuttle Main Engines have begun.

Tomorrow morning as early as 5:30 a.m. EDT, the External Tank will be filled with about 500,000 gallons of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. To fill the tank takes about three hours.

Today, the L-1 day weather forecast shows that the probability of weather prohibiting the launch of Discovery is 40 percent, with the probability of weather prohibiting tanking at only five percent. Temperature at launch time is forecast at 86 degrees and a relative humidity of 70 percent.

The STS-114 crew spent today in various briefings including an Astronaut Support Personnel ingress briefing. This morning, Commander Eileen Collins and Pilot Jim Kelly flew several landing approaches at the Shuttle Landing Facility in the Shuttle Training Aircraft.

The Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ships Liberty Star and Freedom Star departed from KSC at about 12:30 p.m. and are traveling to their location for launch, about 140 nautical miles downrange of the launch pad.

11 July 2005
Following the start of the countdown clock last night at 6 p.m., technicians and the launch team began to work final procedures and closeouts for Space Shuttle Discovery's launch to the International Space Station on mission STS-114. Launch remains on schedule for 3:51 p.m., July 13.

Preparations are complete for the loading of the Power Reactant Storage Distribution system. This is the operation where the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen for the fuel cells is loaded on the orbiter Discovery. The fuel cells provide power to the electrical systems while the vehicle is on orbit. The byproduct is drinking water.

Today, the L-2 day weather forecast shows that the probability of weather prohibiting the launch of Discovery is 30 percent, with the probability of weather prohibiting tanking at only five percent. Temperature at launch time is forecast at 86 degrees and a relative humidity of 70 percent.

The STS-114 crew will spend today in various reviews including a payload systems briefing. Earlier this morning, Commander Eileen Collins and Pilot Jim Kelly flew several landing approaches at the Shuttle Landing Facility in the Shuttle Training Aircraft.

The Solid Rocket Booster retrieval ships Liberty Star and Freedom Star will depart from KSC tomorrow at noon and travel to their location for launch, about 140 nautical miles downrange of the launch pad.

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