Software of the Year

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1998 Award Co-Winners

Award Title:

Tempest

Lead NASA Center:

Glenn Research Center (GRC)

Case Number:

LEW-00098-1

Summary:

Tempest is an embedded Web real-time HTTP server, which accepts requests from standard browsers running on remote clients and returns HTML files. It serves Java applets, CORBA, and virtual reality (VRML), audio, video files, etc. There are two versions: VxWorks (with only a 34kB footprint) and Java, with only 4 to 6 millisecond transaction speeds. Tempest is considered to be breakthrough and enabling technology, which has and will spawn new markets. The embedded processor market itself is expected to be larger than the desktop market and to grow to over $100 billion in the next decade; and workshops already held at Lewis indicate that Tempest-like products are expected to be applicable to most, if not all, of those applications. NASA use of remote control and monitoring of real, physical systems is enabled by Tempest via inter/intranets. Tempest is of commercial quality, fully documented, is simple to install and supports simple graphical user interfaces. Tempest was originally developed to support the Manned Space Flight Program for Shuttle and Station experiment remote control.


Award Title:

Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS)

Lead NASA Centers:

Ames Research Center (ARC)

Case Number:

ARC-14260-1GE

Summary:

Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) Software is a set of three software tools for managing air traffic control systems at major airports: Traffic Management Advisor, Final Approach Spacing Tool, and Conflict Predictor Trial Planner. It is designed to optimize flight operations. It is in daily use at Dallas/Ft. Worth International, the world's busiest airport; seamlessly integrated into the existing radar system, with displays in the control room supplementing the manual air traffic control system. It saves an average of two minutes per flight, in turn saving money for the airlines and the passengers. Center TRACON has been picked by FAA for immediate implementation into all major airports, with an $800 million projected impact. It uses four-dimensional trajectory synthesis algorithms for aircraft path prediction, providing time-based arrival traffic flow visualization, strategic planning based on aircraft separation, and tactical en-route controller advisories for precision metering.