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NES Video Chat: The Big Bang and The Milky Way
May 17, 2011
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Have you ever wondered how our galaxy was formed? In 2006, Dr. John C. Mather won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work with understanding the Big Bang Theory. Mather analyzed data from NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer, or COBE, which studied the pattern of radiation from the first few instants after the universe was formed.


On May 17, 2011, NASA Explorer Schools welcomed Dr. Mather for a talk about what he is working on now, the James Webb Space Telescope. He discussed how it will give us a look into the past to see how galaxies have formed since the Big Bang.

A recording of this chat is located at the bottom of this page.

Related Content:
› James Webb Space Telescope Website
› NASA's Gravity Probe B Confirms Two Einstein Space-Time Theories

GENESIS: Exploring Data – A First Look
› http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/images_nirspec12.html
› http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/images_fgs1.html
› http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/images_mirror1.html
› http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/people.html
› http://www.jwst.nasa.gov/images2/hdr_bobbybradley.jpg
 

 

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Dr. John C. Mather
Dr. John C. Mather is a Senior Astrophysicist in the Observational Cosmology Laboratory located at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
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NASA
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James Webb Space Telescope full-scale model
This James Webb Space Telescope full-scale model at Goddard Space Flight Center.
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NASA
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Hubble image of spiral galaxies NGC 3949
Like our Milky Way, this galaxy has a blue disk of young stars peppered with bright pink star-birth regions.
Image Credit: 
NASA
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Page Last Updated: August 22nd, 2013
Page Editor: NASA Administrator